Andover Canal: A Portrait

Fullerton to Stockbridge

Distance: 3.4 miles (5.5 km)

The stations at Fullerton

When the railway was first opened in March 1865, a station was provided immediately east of the main road bridge and was initially known as Fullerton Bridge. In October 1871 this changed to plain Fullerton. The line was doubled in time for the opening of a branch from Fullerton to Longparish and Hurstbourne (on the Basingstoke to Salisbury line west of Whitchurch) in June 1885. Fullerton station was moved about 150 yards south-eastwards to accommodate the junction. This new station was known as Fullerton Junction from May 1889 to July 1929 when it reverted to plain Fullerton.

The branch to Hurstbourne was closed to passengers in July 1931. Closed completely from Hurstbourne to Longparish in May 1934 and subsequently dismantled, the remaining branch to the latter place was busy during the war serving extensive RAF ammunition stores. The line was completely closed in May 1956. Closure of the “Sprat & Winkle” line came on 7 September 1964 between Kimbridge Junction (north of Romsey) and Andover Town station. The track was lifted and the junction station buildings were demolished in the autumn of 1968 and 1969. The old station house at the original station remains and has been much extended. The remains of its platforms are still present in the garden. The remains of the Junction station’s platforms can be seen in the trees and bushes that now occupy that part of the site.

Having come under the main road bridge and past the old station, the line of the canal followed a course immediately south-west of the Junction station. Fullerton Lock seems to have been located in this area somewhere between the two river crossings of the Test and Anton. It had a small rise of just over 4 feet (1.3m) which is approximately the difference in river levels at the two crossings.

1908 map of Fullerton Junction

This Ordnance Survey map revised in 1908 shows the course of the railway between the crossings of the Rivers Anton and Test. The canal ran on the south-west side of the Junction station.
Mapping date: 1908. © 2019 Reproduced with the permission of the National Library of Scotland (cc-by-nc-sa/4.0). Image from National Library of Scotland website.
Map centre - NG Ref: SU373403. WGS84: 51° 09′ 39″ N, 1° 28′ 02″ W.

1908 map of Fullerton Junction
1908 map of Fullerton Junction

This Ordnance Survey map revised in 1908 shows the course of the railway between the crossings of the Rivers Anton and Test.
Mapping date: 1908.
Map centre - NG Ref: SU373403.
WGS84: 51° 09′ 39″ N, 1° 28′ 02″ W.

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Fullerton Station from the A3057

Part of the original station building can be seen on the left with the 1885 junction station beyond. The siding on the right is roughly where the canal used to be.
Image date: 26 Oct 1957. Image from Denis Cullum. NG Ref: SU379395. WGS84: 51° 09′ 13″ N, 1° 27′ 33″ W.

Fullerton Station from the A3057
Fullerton Station from the A3057

Part of the original station building can be seen on the left with the 1885 junction station beyond. The siding on the right is roughly where the canal used to be.
Image date: 26 Oct 1957.
NG Ref: SU379395.
WGS84: 51° 09′ 13″ N, 1° 27′ 33″ W.

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Fullerton Station approach

This road led to Fullerton Junction Station, past the old station building on the right - now much enlarged.
Image date: Unknown. Image from http://mapio.net/. NG Ref: SU379395. WGS84: 51° 09′ 14″ N, 1° 27′ 32″ W.

Fullerton Station approach
Fullerton Station approach

This road led to Fullerton Junction Station, past the old station building on the right - now much enlarged.
Image date: Unknown.
NG Ref: SU379395.
WGS84: 51° 09′ 14″ N, 1° 27′ 32″ W.

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Disused Fullerton Station

Looking north from the up platform of the 1885 station towards Clatford, showing the down platform beyond which used to run the canal.
Image date: 23 Mar 2017. © Nigel Thompson (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU380393. WGS84: 51° 09′ 08″ N, 1° 27′ 24″ W.

Disused Fullerton Station
Disused Fullerton Station

Looking north from the up platform of the 1885 station towards Clatford, showing the down platform beyond which used to run the canal.
Image date: 23 Mar 2017.
NG Ref: SU380393.
WGS84: 51° 09′ 08″ N, 1° 27′ 24″ W.

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Fullerton Station to Testcombe

South of Fullerton station, the canal crossed the River Test on a low aqueduct. When converted to a single track railway, it seems that the railway crossed the river in the same place although the railway track southwards was up to about 12 yards (11m) to the west of the canal to ease the curve under the Testcombe road bridge. When the line was doubled in the early 1880’s the line was further eased to the west by up to 25 yards (23m) more. The old routes of the canal and the earlier railway have been incorporated into the grounds of the houses in Coley Lane. Also Kitecombe Lock was probably between the road bridge and the Test aqueduct and little if any trace of these features is visible today.

The canal / railway route passes under the A3057 again at Testcombe Bridge. In the 18th century, Testcombe was usually referred to as Kitcombe or Kitecombe and earlier as Titcombe. Maybe Victorian sensibilities were put out by the latter form and is today called Testcombe. In fact there are now 3 bridges in close proximity. The first is the bridge over the River Test next to The Mayfly public house (formerly the Seven Stars). Then to the east come two two-arch bridges that each spanned railway lines.

The first railway bridge was built in about 1864 on the course of the canal, replacing the waterway bridge. It has two arches to accommodate a double track but only the western arch was ever used. When the line was doubled in the 1880s, a new bridge was built about 25 yards (23m) to the west so that a less sharp curve could be laid out and this involved moving about 100 yards of the easternmost channel of the River Test south of the road a few yards to the west. Somewhat surprisingly, the older railway bridge was not demolished.

Immediately north of the railway bridges, the Test Way joins the route of the dismantled railway. This long distance path runs for 44 miles (71km) from Inkpen Hill, just over the county boundary in Berkshire, to Eling at the head of Southampton Water. The Way utilises the former railway until Lower Brook, north of Romsey.

Bridge over the River Test

Seen from the A3057 is the former railway bridge over the River Test which replaced a canal aqueduct on the same site.
Image date: 14 Nov 2005. © Peter Oates 2005. NG Ref: SU380391. WGS84: 51° 09′ 00″ N, 1° 27′ 24″ W.

Bridge over the River Test
Bridge over the River Test

Seen from the A3057 is the former railway bridge over the River Test which replaced a canal aqueduct on the same site.
Image date: 14 Nov 2005.
NG Ref: SU380391.
WGS84: 51° 09′ 00″ N, 1° 27′ 24″ W.

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Across the Test

Looking south across the railway bridge over the River Test.
Image date: 31 Oct 2013. © James Harrison (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU381392. WGS84: 51° 09′ 04″ N, 1° 27′ 20″ W.

Looking across the River Test bridge
Across the Test

Looking south across the railway bridge over the River Test.
Image date: 31 Oct 2013.
NG Ref: SU381392.
WGS84: 51° 09′ 04″ N, 1° 27′ 20″ W.

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Train crossing River Test

The fourth carriage (almost hidden by the signal post) is passing over the River Test as no 6341 passes the down home signal on its way from Cheltenham Spa (Lansdown) to Southampton Terminus.
Image date: 26 Oct 1957. Image from J J Smith. NG Ref: SU382391. WGS84: 51° 09′ 01″ N, 1° 27′ 18″ W.

Train crossing River Test
Train crossing River Test

The fourth carriage (almost hidden by the signal post) is passing over the River Test as no 6341 passes the down home signal on its way from Cheltenham to Southampton.
Image date: 26 Oct 1957.
NG Ref: SU382391.
WGS84: 51° 09′ 01″ N, 1° 27′ 18″ W.

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Looking towards the Test crossing

Taken from almost the same spot as the picture of locomotive no 6341 and its load but nearly sixty years later.
Image date: 31 Oct 2013. © David Martin (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU382391. WGS84: 51° 09′ 00″ N, 1° 27′ 18″ W.

Looking back towards the Test crossing
Looking towards the Test crossing

Taken from almost the same spot as the picture of locomotive no 6341 and its load but nearly sixty years later.
Image date: 31 Oct 2013.
NG Ref: SU382391.
WGS84: 51° 09′ 00″ N, 1° 27′ 18″ W.

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Site of the canal at Testcombe

The canal crossed the present garden of The Coach House just on the far side of these buildings - the first railway line passed about 10 yards nearer the camera which is on the trackbed of the later railway.
Image date: 27 Apr 2021. © 2021 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU382390. WGS84: 51° 08′ 57″ N, 1° 27′ 16″ W.

The canal ran just east of these buildings
Site of the canal at Testcombe

The canal crossed the present garden of The Coach House just on the far side of these buildings.
Image date: 27 Apr 2021.
NG Ref: SU382390.
WGS84: 51° 08′ 57″ N, 1° 27′ 16″ W.

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Three bridges at Testcombe

Viewed from the south: the Seven Stars public house (now called The Mayfly) is on the left. Then comes the bridge over the River Test, in the middle the newer railway bridge and then the original railway bridge on the site of the canal bridge.
Image date: 1910. Image from postcard posted in 1941 but identical to an uncoloured photo dated 1910. NG Ref: SU382388. WGS84: 51° 08′ 52″ N, 1° 27′ 16″ W.

Three bridges at Testcombe
Three bridges at Testcombe

Viewed from the south: the Seven Stars pub (now called The Mayfly) is on the left. Then comes the bridge over the River Test, in the middle the newer railway bridge and then the original railway bridge on the site of the canal bridge.
Image date: 1910.
NG Ref: SU382388.
WGS84: 51° 08′ 52″ N, 1° 27′ 16″ W.

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Newer railway bridge at Testcombe

This is the newer railway bridge at Testcombe viewed from the north looking towards Stockbridge and which is the one used by the Test Way.
Image date: 31 Oct 2013. © James Harrison (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU382389. WGS84: 51° 08′ 56″ N, 1° 27′ 18″ W.

Newer railway bridge at Testcombe
Newer railway bridge at Testcombe

This is the newer railway bridge at Testcombe viewed from the north looking towards Stockbridge and which is the one used by the Test Way.
Image date: 31 Oct 2013.
NG Ref: SU382389.
WGS84: 51° 08′ 56″ N, 1° 27′ 18″ W.

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Older railway bridge at Testcombe

This is the eastern arch of the original railway bridge at Testcombe viewed from the north. Although built for the second track should the line be doubled, this arch never carried railway traffic. It is on the site of the former canal bridge.
Image date: 11 Oct 2008. © Chris Talbot (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU382389. WGS84: 51° 08′ 56″ N, 1° 27′ 17″ W.

Older railway bridge at Testcombe
Older railway bridge at Testcombe

This is the eastern arch of the original railway bridge at Testcombe viewed from the north. This arch never carried railway traffic but is on the site of the former canal bridge.
Image date: 11 Oct 2008.
NG Ref: SU382389.
WGS84: 51° 08′ 56″ N, 1° 27′ 17″ W.

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Canal line now part of gardens

Looking north from the older railway bridge carrying the A3057, the stream in the garden of The Coach House appears to be a remnant of the canal. The single track railway ran slightly to the west.
Image date: Apr 2011. © 2021 Google. Image from Google Street View. NG Ref: SU382389. WGS84: 51° 08′ 55″ N, 1° 27′ 16″ W.

Line of canal passes through these gardens
Canal line now part of gardens

Looking north from the older railway bridge carrying the A3057, the stream in the garden of The Coach House appears to be a remnant of the canal.
Image date: Apr 2011.
NG Ref: SU382389.
WGS84: 51° 08′ 55″ N, 1° 27′ 16″ W.

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Testcombe to Leckford

The former canal / railway now runs beside or near to the A3057 all the way to Stockbridge along the east side of the Test valley and initially with the River Test just a few yards to the west. In some places where the railway eased bends in the canal line, a depression beside the railway formation can be seen amongst the trees and bushes but in many places the original line of the railway coincided with the canal.

The first accommodation bridge over the former railway is ⅔ mile (1.0km) south of Testcombe. A few yards north of the bridge, the line of the canal veers east slightly to run about a dozen yards east of and parallel to the railway. Nearly 200 yards (180m) south of the bridge, a depression in the wide “verge” on the south-east side of the Test Way marks the position of Leckford Lock.

As the canal passed the west side of Leckford village, there were a number of bridges (most of which were probably wooden lift bridges) over the waterway to enable access to the meadows between the canal and the River Test. When the original single track railway was built in the 1860s these seem to have been replaced by level crossings but when the second track was added in the 1880s some of them were replaced by overbridges but there is evidence on the ground that some level crossings were retained.

South of Testcombe

Looking south from the A3057 at a train beside the River Test. Neat permanent way buildings in the foreground have a cared-for little garden. The canal and the original line of the railway ran to the left of the camera.
Image date: Spring 1958. Image from N Sprinks. NG Ref: SU382389. WGS84: 51° 08′ 55″ N, 1° 27′ 17″ W.

Looking south from A3057 at Testcombe
South of Testcombe

Looking south from the A3057 at a train beside the River Test. The canal and the original line of the railway ran to the left of the camera.
Image date: Spring 1958.
NG Ref: SU382389.
WGS84: 51° 08′ 55″ N, 1° 27′ 17″ W.

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No more gardening!

The same hut shown in the previous picture (but looking in the opposite direction) is now almost hidden in the undergrowth.
Image date: 22 May 2010. © Chris Talbot (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU382389. WGS84: 51° 08′ 54″ N, 1° 27′ 18″ W.

Overgrown railway hut
No more gardening!

The same hut shown in the previous picture is now almost hidden in the undergrowth.
Image date: 22 May 2010.
NG Ref: SU382389.
WGS84: 51° 08′ 54″ N, 1° 27′ 18″ W.

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Heading south on the Test Way

Today, much of the way to Stockbridge is through an area of many trees.
Image date: 20 Sep 2013. © Nigel Cox (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU381388. WGS84: 51° 08′ 51″ N, 1° 27′ 20″ W.

Heading south on the wooded Test Way
Heading south on the Test Way

Today, much of the way to Stockbridge is through an area of many trees.
Image date: 20 Sep 2013.
NG Ref: SU381388.
WGS84: 51° 08′ 51″ N, 1° 27′ 20″ W.

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First accommodation bridge

This is the south side of the first bridge over the railway south of Testcombe.
Image date: 27 Apr 2021. © 2021 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU377380. WGS84: 51° 08′ 26″ N, 1° 27′ 45″ W.

First accommodation bridge south of Testcombe
First accommodation bridge

This is the south side of the first bridge over the railway south of Testcombe.
Image date: 27 Apr 2021.
NG Ref: SU377380.
WGS84: 51° 08′ 26″ N, 1° 27′ 45″ W.

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Site of Leckford Lock

On the south-east side of the Test Way, this depression is the remains of Leckford Lock.
Image date: 27 Apr 2021. © 2021 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU376379. WGS84: 51° 08′ 21″ N, 1° 27′ 49″ W.

Site of Leckford Lock
Site of Leckford Lock

On the south-east side of the Test Way, this depression is the remains of Leckford Lock.
Image date: 27 Apr 2021.
NG Ref: SU376379.
WGS84: 51° 08′ 21″ N, 1° 27′ 49″ W.

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Remains of Leckford Lock

At the head of the lock are these remains of brickwork, probably part of the top cill.
Image date: 27 Apr 2021. © 2021 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU376379. WGS84: 51° 08′ 21″ N, 1° 27′ 49″ W.

Remains of Leckford Lock
Remains of Leckford Lock

At the head of the lock are these remains of brickwork, probably part of the top cill.
Image date: 27 Apr 2021.
NG Ref: SU376379.
WGS84: 51° 08′ 21″ N, 1° 27′ 49″ W.

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Second accommodation bridge

This accommodation bridge carries a minor track over the railway line in the village of Leckford.
Image date: 21 Jan 2019. © David Martin (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU374377. WGS84: 51° 08′ 17″ N, 1° 28′ 00″ W.

Accommodation bridge in the village of Leckford
Second accommodation bridge

This bridge carries a minor track over the railway line in the village of Leckford.
Image date: 21 Jan 2019.
NG Ref: SU374377.
WGS84: 51° 08′ 17″ N, 1° 28′ 00″ W.

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Leckford to Whiteshape Bridge

About a quarter of a mile after the second accommodation bridge, the remains of the canal can be found next to the A3057 road. Both the older single track and later double track railway adopted the same slightly straighter route up to 25 yards (23m) away from the canal.

Just north of the third accommodation bridge after Testcombe, the course of the canal crosses to the north-west side of the railway and then rejoins the course of the railway after about 270 yards (250m). From here to Whiteshape Railway Bridge all traces of the canal were obliterated by the doubling of the railway.

The next bridge is known today as Whiteshape Railway Bridge and carries a road known as “The Bunny” from the A3057 across the valley to the village of Longstock. The railway bridge replaced the earlier canal bridge and the next lock was probably on the north side of this Approximate position NG Ref: SU364366. WGS84: 51° 07′ 40″ N, 1° 28′ 50″ W.. The cartographer George Bradshaw, in 1830, gives the name of this lock as White Ship Lock. Ordnance Survey mapping before 1870 doesn’t name the bridge but after that date the name “Whiteshape” appears. Did Bradshaw mis-spell the name or is the more modern name a corruption? We’ll probably never know. A long time local resident is certain the name is “Whiteshape” because of the huge chalk cutting (now largely obscured by vegetation) on the east side of the A3057 that was used to fill in the canal when building the railway. However, was the chalk pit there before that?

Alongside the road

South of Leckford village, the canal ran next to the main road for about half a mile (0.8km) whilst both the single and later double track railway ran a little to the north-west.
Image date: 27 Apr 2021. © 2021 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU368370. WGS84: 51° 07′ 53″ N, 1° 28′ 31″ W.

The course of the canal next to the A3057
Alongside the road

South of Leckford village, the canal ran next to the main road for about half a mile (0.8km).
Image date: 27 Apr 2021.
NG Ref: SU368370.
WGS84: 51° 07′ 53″ N, 1° 28′ 31″ W.

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Third accommodation bridge

It is in the vicinity of this bridge that the line of the canal crosses the course of the railway to run on the north-west side.
Image date: 27 Apr 2021. © 2021 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU366369. WGS84: 51° 07′ 50″ N, 1° 28′ 37″ W.

The third accommodation bridge
Third accommodation bridge

It is in the vicinity of this bridge that the line of the canal crosses the course of the railway to run on the north-west side.
Image date: 27 Apr 2021.
NG Ref: SU366369.
WGS84: 51° 07′ 50″ N, 1° 28′ 37″ W.

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Whiteshape Railway Bridge

The road bridge that spans the railway has been reinforced with girders. It is thought that White Ship Lock lay on this, the north, side of the bridge.
Image date: 27 Apr 2021. © 2021 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU364366. WGS84: 51° 07′ 40″ N, 1° 28′ 50″ W.

Whiteshape Railway Bridge
Whiteshape Railway Bridge

The road bridge that spans the railway has been reinforced with girders. It is thought that White Ship Lock lay on this, the north, side of the bridge.
Image date: 27 Apr 2021.
NG Ref: SU364366.
WGS84: 51° 07′ 40″ N, 1° 28′ 50″ W.

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Whiteshape Railway Bridge

This is Whiteshape Railway Bridge looking north-west from the A3057 road. The canal / railway was squeezed in between the main road and a side stream of the River Test.
Image date: 17 Dec 2010. © Chris Talbot (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU364365. WGS84: 51° 07′ 39″ N, 1° 28′ 51″ W.

Whiteshape Railway Bridge looking from the A3057 road
Whiteshape Railway Bridge

This is Whiteshape Railway Bridge looking north-west from the A3057 road.
Image date: 17 Dec 2010.
NG Ref: SU364365.
WGS84: 51° 07′ 39″ N, 1° 28′ 51″ W.

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Whiteshape Bridge to Stockbridge

South of Whiteshape Bridge, the canal and the original railway line ran alongside Leckford Lane (A3057) for over half a mile. This included (in railway terms) two sharpish curves and when the line was doubled a smoother, less sharp curve took the line further from the road. A ditch ran (and still runs) between the road and the site of the single track railway: this is a remnant of the canal. It appears that the original single track railway was built on a ‘widened towing path’, leaving a narrowed channel for drainage.

After about a third of a mile (0.5km) from Whiteshape Bridge, the course of the canal / railway is now used as an access to some fields to the west. After a further 300 yards (290m) the course emerges onto the A3057.

A few years after the railway had been dismantled, a new road from the east end of Stockbridge High Street was built northwards along the railway's course which included realignment of part of Leckford Lane north of the A30 road to Basingstoke. Thus, the newer railway alignment is followed by the modern road. The line of the canal and the original railway (built on the waterway) runs in the trees and bushes on the eastern side of the modern road. Leckford Lane (A3057) used to run across the field to the east joining the A30 about 150 yards (140m) east of the roundabout.

Some 200 yards (180m) south of the roundabout with the A30 to Basingstoke, the site of Stockbridge Lock NG Ref: SU360353. WGS84: 51° 06′ 57″ N, 1° 29′ 12″ W. lies on the east side of the new road but the construction of the original railway seems to have destroyed it.

South of the site of the lock, lies the site of Stockbridge Station and its associated goods yard but all traces of both the canal and railway have disappeared. The canal company had a wharf in Stockbridge NG Ref: SU358350. WGS84: 51° 06′ 50″ N, 1° 29′ 19″ W.. This was just north of the bridge carrying main road from Salisbury to Winchester over the canal and later the site of the station goods yard. When the canal was converted, the road was diverted over the railway via a long bridge just north of the old road alignment. With the closure of the railway, the site of road bridge and the station buildings is now occupied by the roundabout at the east end of the High Street.

Canal south of Whiteshape Bridge

Soon after leaving Whiteshape Bridge, the course of the canal runs again alongside the west side of the A3057.
Image date: 27 Apr 2021. © 2021 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU361361. WGS84: 51° 07′ 25″ N, 1° 29′ 04″ W.

Canal south of Whiteshape Bridge
Canal south of Whiteshape Bridge

Soon after leaving Whiteshape Bridge, the course of the canal runs again alongside the west side of the A3057.
Image date: 27 Apr 2021.
NG Ref: SU361361.
WGS84: 51° 07′ 25″ N, 1° 29′ 04″ W.

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Former railway used as track

Looking back towards Whiteshape Bridge, the course of the canal / railway runs beside the A3057 which is on the right.
Image date: 27 Apr 2021. © 2021 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU361359. WGS84: 51° 07′ 17″ N, 1° 29′ 07″ W.

Canal south of Whiteshape Bridge
Former railway used as track

Looking back towards Whiteshape Bridge, the course of the canal / railway runs beside the A3057 which is on the right.
Image date: 27 Apr 2021.
NG Ref: SU361359.
WGS84: 51° 07′ 17″ N, 1° 29′ 07″ W.

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Canal line emerges onto A3057

At a point about half a mile (900m) south of Whiteshape Bridge, the line of the canal and the railway emerges onto Leckford Lane.
Image date: May 2015. © 2018 Google. Image from Google Street View. NG Ref: SU361358. WGS84: 51° 07′ 14″ N, 1° 29′ 06″ W.

Line of canal emerges onto the A3057 road
Canal line emerges onto A3057

At a point about half a mile (900m) south of Whiteshape Bridge, the line of the canal and the railway emerges onto Leckford Lane.
Image date: May 2015.
NG Ref: SU361358.
WGS84: 51° 07′ 14″ N, 1° 29′ 06″ W.

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Course of canal and railways

The site of the canal and the older railway runs through the trees and bushes on the left. The later line of the railway coincides with the realigned Leckford Lane (A3057) and the new road south of the next roundabout.
Image date: Apr 2011. © 2021 Google. Image from Google Street View. NG Ref: SU361356. WGS84: 51° 07′ 08″ N, 1° 29′ 08″ W.

Course of canal and railways
Course of canal and railways

The line of the canal and the older railway runs through the trees and bushes on the left.
Image date: Apr 2011.
NG Ref: SU361356.
WGS84: 51° 07′ 08″ N, 1° 29′ 08″ W.

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The site of Stockbridge Lock

South of the A30 roundabout, the site of Stockbridge Lock lies on the east side of the new road in the trees and bushes this side of the brown sign. The lock was destroyed with the construction of the railway.
Image date: May 2015. © 2018 Google. Image from Google Street View. NG Ref: SU360352. WGS84: 51° 06′ 57″ N, 1° 29′ 12″ W.

The site of Stockbridge Lock
The site of Stockbridge Lock

South of the A30 roundabout, the site of Stockbridge Lock lies on the east side of the new road in the trees and bushes this side of the brown sign.
Image date: May 2015.
NG Ref: SU360352.
WGS84: 51° 06′ 57″ N, 1° 29′ 12″ W.

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North of Stockbridge Station

Looking towards Andover, Stockbridge Lock was situated just left of the trees on the right. The original single track railway followed the canal destroying the lock, but when doubled the line was straightened.
Image date: 26 Oct 1957. Image from Denis Cullum. NG Ref: SU359352. WGS84: 51° 06′ 54″ N, 1° 29′ 15″ W.

North of Stockbridge Station
North of Stockbridge Station

Looking towards Andover, Stockbridge Lock was situated just left of the trees on the right. The original single track railway followed the canal destroying the lock, but when doubled the line was straightened.
Image date: 26 Oct 1957.
NG Ref: SU359352.
WGS84: 51° 06′ 54″ N, 1° 29′ 15″ W.

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Stockbridge Station from the air

An aerial view of Stockbridge Station looking south. All traces of the railway, station buildings and goods yard have now gone. Stockbridge Lock was near the big tree at the bottom of the picture.
Image date: Jul 1930. © Historic England. Image from https://britainfromabove.org.uk. Approx NG Ref: SU361353. Approx WGS84: 51° 07′ 00″ N, 1° 29′ 07″ W.

Aerial view of Stockbridge Station
Stockbridge Station from the air

An aerial view of Stockbridge Station looking south. All traces of the railway, station buildings and goods yard have now gone.
Image date: Jul 1930.
Approx NG Ref: SU361353.
Approx WGS84: 51° 07′ 00″ N, 1° 29′ 07″ W.

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Site of Stockbridge Station

This picture was taken looking north from the site of the up platform at Stockbridge Station. The canal was on the immediate left of the camera.
Image date: 7 Nov 2005. © 2005 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU359351. WGS84: 51° 06′ 52″ N, 1° 29′ 17″ W.

View north from site of Stockbridge Station
Site of Stockbridge Station

This picture was taken looking north from the site of the up platform at Stockbridge Station. The canal was on the immediate left of the camera.
Image date: 7 Nov 2005.
NG Ref: SU359351.
WGS84: 51° 06′ 52″ N, 1° 29′ 17″ W.

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Site of Stockbridge Station

View of the site of Stockbridge Station looking south along the platforms from their northern end. The canal was on the immediate left. The main station buildings were where the right hand car and road sign can be seen.
Image date: 23 Mar 2017. © Nigel Thompson (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU359352. WGS84: 51° 06′ 54″ N, 1° 29′ 16″ W.

Site of Stockbridge Station
Site of Stockbridge Station

View of the site of Stockbridge Station looking south along the platforms from their northern end. The canal was on the immediate left.
Image date: 23 Mar 2017.
NG Ref: SU359352.
WGS84: 51° 06′ 54″ N, 1° 29′ 16″ W.

(70.8KB)

Stockbridge Railway Bridge

The hump-backed bridge at the south end of the station carrying the A30 into the High Street. The earlier canal bridge was immediately to the left of the railway bridge and would not have been so high. The large gable end on the right was part of the main station building.
Image date: 1960s. © Not known. NG Ref: SU360350. WGS84: 51° 06′ 48″ N, 1° 29′ 12″ W.

Stockbridge Railway Bridge
Stockbridge Railway Bridge

The hump-backed bridge at the south end of the station carrying the A30 into the High Street. The earlier canal bridge was immediately to the left of the railway bridge.
Image date: 1960s.
NG Ref: SU360350.
WGS84: 51° 06′ 48″ N, 1° 29′ 12″ W.

(53.6KB)