Itchen Navigation: A Portrait

Fish House Bay - Lock House Lock

Distance: 0.9 mile (1.4 km)

The Itchen Way along the Navigation between Bishopstoke and Mansbridge is currently the least well used section of the path and as a result is walkable but unkempt and less “cared for”. After wet weather, the path can be quite muddy. Also it should be pointed out that the walk between these two places is over three miles and that it is almost impossible to gain access to, or leave, the path en route. It is possible to access or leave the path at Fish House Bay or via the Itchen Valley Country Park visitor centre across the meadows but this latter may be wetter/muddier and no shorter than the Itchen Way.

Introduction

Between Fish House Bay and Mans Bridge on the outskirts of Southampton, the Navigation was constructed along the edge of a river terrace which forms a flat area to the west generally about 10 - 15 feet above the flat valley floor. In general, the canal was constructed above the level of the meadows to help with one of the Navigation's main purposes - that was to provide water for the controlled flooding of the water meadows especially in winter and early spring.

Much of the bed and banks of the canal as far as Mans Bridge are now covered with trees and bushes but, as these have matured, the amount of undergrowth has been reducing slightly in recent years. Since Eastleigh Borough Council acquired the meadows forming part of the Itchen Valley Country Park, it seems that a strip of woodland between the Navigation and the meadows is being encouraged. A number of small springs along the edge of the river terrace feed water into the Navigation. Parts of the canal bed are waterlogged even in the driest weather despite attempts to drain it by breaching the towing path or inserting pipes through it.

Fish House Bay to Chicken Hall Railway Bridge

Within a few yards, the Itchen Way path crosses the dry course of the canal to the west side. Originally, the towing path continued along the east bank of the Navigation all the way to Mansbridge Lock but this seems have been closed off as far as Chicken Hall Railway Bridge when the hatches at Fish House Bay was destroyed. Until the 1980s an allotment or vegetable garden used to occupy the bed of the canal on the south side of the path crossing that waterway.

The present day public footpath now turns south again along a metalled track which is an extension of Chicken Hall Lane. This track runs between the Navigation and Chicken Hall Sewage Works to the west. As the track climbs up a rise, the course of the canal was tucked in below the hill. At one point, the main River Itchen comes so close to the Navigation that it has been threatening to erode the east bank of the canal. The track descends again to run alongside the course of the canal.

Junction of path and track
Junction of path and track

The Itchen Way joins the track on the west side of the “dry” canal.
Image date: 4 Mar 2013. © Shazz (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU466185. WGS84: 50° 57′ 51″ N 1° 20′ 14″ W.

Junction of path and track

The Itchen Way joins the track on the west side of the “dry” canal.
Image date: 4 Mar 2013.
NG Ref: SU466185.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 51″ N 1° 20′ 14″ W.

(112.3KB)

Former allotment
Former allotment

Former allotment on the line of the Navigation immediately south of the path from Fish House Bay. This vegetable garden has now been abandoned.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2010 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466184. WGS84: 50° 57′ 50″ N 1° 20′ 13″ W.

Former allotment

Former allotment on the line of the Navigation immediately south of the path from Fish House Bay.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU466184.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 50″ N 1° 20′ 13″ W.

(90.6KB)

Remains of shed
Remains of shed

The shed on the former allotment has fallen into ruin.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466185. WGS84: 50° 57′ 51″ N 1° 20′ 14″ W.

Remains of shed

The shed on the former allotment has fallen into ruin.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU466185.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 51″ N 1° 20′ 14″ W.

(95.9KB)

Guarding the fish
Guarding the fish

Entrance to part of the Lower Bishopstoke Fishery.
Image date: 25 Sep 2009. © 2010 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466184. WGS84: 50° 57′ 50″ N 1° 20′ 13″ W.

Guarding the fish

Entrance to part of the Lower Bishopstoke Fishery.
Image date: 25 Sep 2009.
NG Ref: SU466184.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 50″ N 1° 20′ 13″ W.

(127.3KB)

Canal now a car park
Canal now a car park

Inside the entrance to the fishery and after some tree clearance, the line of the Navigation can be seen lying at the bottom of this slope between the cars.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466184. WGS84: 50° 57′ 50″ N 1° 20′ 13″ W.

Canal now a car park

Inside the entrance to the fishery, the line of the Navigation lies at the bottom of this slope between the cars.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU466184.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 50″ N 1° 20′ 13″ W.

(78.1KB)

The Itchen Way
The Itchen Way

Looking back towards Bishopstoke, the Itchen Way follows this track.
Image date: 3 May 2014. © 2014 Marie Keates. Image from www.iwalkalone.co.uk. NG Ref: SU466184. WGS84: 50° 57′ 50″ N 1° 20′ 13″ W.

The Itchen Way

Looking back towards Bishopstoke, the Itchen Way follows this track.
Image date: 3 May 2014.
NG Ref: SU466184.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 50″ N 1° 20′ 13″ W.

(74.8KB)

Course of the Navigation
Course of the Navigation

The line of the Navigation lies between the trees on the steep bank on the left and the main River Itchen on the right. The junction of the Barton River and the main river is in the middle distance. This view has now been fenced off.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2010 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466183. WGS84: 50° 57′ 47″ N 1° 20′ 11″ W.

Course of the Navigation

The line of the Navigation lies between the trees on the steep bank on the left and the main River Itchen on the right.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU466183.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 47″ N 1° 20′ 11″ W.

(94.3KB)

Course of the Navigation
Course of the Navigation

The line of the Navigation seen through the trees from the track close to the position from which the previous photograph was taken.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466183. WGS84: 50° 57′ 47″ N 1° 20′ 11″ W.

Course of the Navigation

The line of the Navigation seen through the trees from the track close to the position from which the previous photograph was taken.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU466183.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 47″ N 1° 20′ 11″ W.

(109.7KB)

Course of the canal
Course of the canal

After the Itchen Way descends from the slight hill, the course of the canal runs next to the track.
Image date: 25 Oct 2003. © 2010 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU467182. WGS84: 50° 57′ 43″ N 1° 20′ 06″ W.

Course of the canal

After the Itchen Way descends from the slight hill, the course of the canal runs next to the track.
Image date: 25 Oct 2003.
NG Ref: SU467182.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 43″ N 1° 20′ 06″ W.

(135.0KB)

About four hundred yards from Fish House Bay, the track passes through a gate, crossing the site of the canal, which ran just on the east side of the fence. The footpath continues to the right of the gate.

Here is one of the few places were the canal has been actively destroyed, happening here in about 1977. The public footpath continues southwards between what was the west side of the Navigation and the sewage works. After about 150 yards, the remains of the canal can once again be seen on the east side of the footpath. At the south end of the sewage works the public footpath diverges from the Navigation as it passes the site of Chicken Hall Farm which stood to the west. Some 140 yards south of the sewage works, the Navigation has again been destroyed where the footpath crosses a field to Chicken Hall railway bridge. Near the north end of this field there used to be a wooden occupation bridge known as Chickenhall Bridge but no trace of it can be seen.

Track crosses the canal
Track crosses the canal

The track passes through a gate and crosses the course of the Navigation. The footpath continues on the right.
Image date: 25 Oct 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU467182. WGS84: 50° 57′ 43″ N 1° 20′ 07″ W.

Track crosses the canal

The track passes through a gate and crosses the course of the Navigation. The footpath continues on the right.
Image date: 25 Oct 2003.
NG Ref: SU467182.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 43″ N 1° 20′ 07″ W.

(108.4KB)

Site of the infilled canal
Site of the infilled canal

Looking south, the Navigation ran to the right of the building and against the fence on the right.
Image date: 30 Mar 2012. © Chris Wimbush (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU467182. WGS84: 50° 57′ 41″ N 1° 20′ 08″ W.

Site of the infilled canal

Looking south, the Navigation ran to the right of the building and against the fence on the right.
Image date: 30 Mar 2012.
NG Ref: SU467182.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 41″ N 1° 20′ 08″ W.

(127.1KB)

Destruction of the canal
Destruction of the canal

Work has started to construct a pipeline from the sewage works across the Navigation whilst children scour the spoil for ‘treasure’. Hawthorn trees beyond mark the two canal banks.
Image date: Autumn 1975. Image scanned from negative. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU467181. WGS84: 50° 57′ 39″ N 1° 20′ 11″ W.

Destruction of the canal

Work has started to construct a pipeline from the sewage works across the Navigation whilst children scour the spoil for ‘treasure’.
Image date: Autumn 1975.
NG Ref: SU467181.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 39″ N 1° 20′ 11″ W.

(61.4KB)

A section of the canal destroyed
A section of the canal destroyed

The section of the Navigation, looking north, destroyed by building of the pipeline from the sewage works completed only weeks before. The line of the original towing path shown by right hand trees.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2010 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU467181. WGS84: 50° 57′ 39″ N 1° 20′ 11″ W.

A section of the canal destroyed

The section of the Navigation, looking north, destroyed by building of the pipeline from the sewage works completed only weeks before.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU467181.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 39″ N 1° 20′ 11″ W.

(73.1KB)

More canal destroyed
More canal destroyed

Since completion of the pipeline, on the 100 yard section northward both banks have been ploughed out and the channel partially infilled.
Image date: Summer 1978. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU467181. WGS84: 50° 57′ 39″ N 1° 20′ 11″ W.

More canal destroyed

Since completion of the pipeline, on the 100 yard section northward both banks have been ploughed out and the channel partially infilled.
Image date: Summer 1978.
NG Ref: SU467181.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 39″ N 1° 20′ 11″ W.

(59.7KB)

Dry canal bed
Dry canal bed

South of the destroyed section, the canal bed is reasonably intact. The towing path bank can be seen across the empty canal.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU467180. WGS84: 50° 57′ 37″ N 1° 20′ 11″ W.

Dry canal bed

South of the destroyed section, the canal bed is reasonably intact. The towing path bank can be seen across the empty canal.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU467180.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 37″ N 1° 20′ 11″ W.

(85.2KB)

Near the site of Chicken Hall Farm
Near the site of Chicken Hall Farm

South of the sewage works is the site of Chicken Hall Farm (behind the camera) and the footpath moves about 30 yards away from the well defined Navigation.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU467179. WGS84: 50° 57′ 34″ N 1° 20′ 11″ W.

Near the site of Chicken Hall Farm

South of the sewage works is the site of Chicken Hall Farm and the footpath moves about 30 yards away from the well defined Navigation.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU467179.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 34″ N 1° 20′ 11″ W.

(82.0KB)

Rejoining the Navigation
Rejoining the Navigation

Looking south to the point where the path meets the course of the canal again.
Image date: 10 Jan 2018. © 2018 Keith Murray (cc-by-nc-nd/2.0). Image from www.flickr.com. NG Ref: SU466178. WGS84: 50° 57′ 31″ N 1° 20′ 11″ W.

Rejoining the Navigation

Looking south to the point where the path meets the course of the canal again.
Image date: 10 Jan 2018.
NG Ref: SU466178.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 31″ N 1° 20′ 11″ W.

(116.1KB)

End of dry canal south of Chicken Hall Farm
End of dry canal south of Chicken Hall Farm

This is the northern end of a length of infilled canal north of the railway. The braced fence post behind the cattle is on the end of the old towing path bank. Chickenhall Bridge, an occupation bridge, was a few yards south of this point.
Image date: 25 Oct 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466178. WGS84: 50° 57′ 30″ N 1° 20′ 12″ W.

End of dry canal south of Chicken Hall Farm

This is the northern end of a length of infilled canal north of the railway. The braced fence post behind the cattle is on the end of the old towing path bank.
Image date: 25 Oct 2003.
NG Ref: SU466178.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 30″ N 1° 20′ 12″ W.

(145.9KB)

North of the railway
North of the railway

Site of infilled canal north of the railway looking towards Bishopstoke from near the bridge.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2010 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466177. WGS84: 50° 57′ 27″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

North of the railway

Site of infilled canal north of the railway looking towards Bishopstoke from near the bridge.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU466177.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 27″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

(78.6KB)

Looking towards the railway
Looking towards the railway

Looking south with the site of the canal on the left of the fence. A modern culvert for a drain passes under the path but emerges in the middle of the course of the Navigation.
Image date: 27 Apr 2013. © 2013 Clive Richardson (cc-by-nc-nd/2.0). Image from www.flickr.com. NG Ref: SU466178. WGS84: 50° 57′ 28″ N 1° 20′ 14″ W.

Looking towards the railway

Looking south with the site of the canal on the left of the fence.
Image date: 27 Apr 2013.
NG Ref: SU466178.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 28″ N 1° 20′ 14″ W.

(111.5KB)

Chicken Hall Railway Bridge

The Eastleigh to Fareham railway line was opened in 1841 and crossed the Navigation by means of a two arched bridge, the second arch on the east side of the canal providing access for the occupiers of land on either side of the railway.

However, in 1979, the bridge had to be rebuilt and the present ‘Armco tube’ was considered the most economical. Mindful of their legal obligations towards the Navigation, British Rail took care in its installation to ensure that sufficient width at the correct level was provided to accommodate the Navigation should it ever be restored. In the meantime, the footpath passes through the arch provided for the canal. The actual demolition of the old bridge, craning in the Armco tube, making good the embankment and replacement of the track was all accomplished inside 48 hours over one weekend.

Old Chicken Hall Railway Bridge
Old Chicken Hall Railway Bridge

The old two-arched Chicken Hall railway bridge from the north.
Image date: Autumn 1975. Image scanned from slide. © 2010 Charles Hockley. NG Ref: SU466178. WGS84: 50° 57′ 28″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

Old Chicken Hall Railway Bridge

The old two-arched Chicken Hall railway bridge from the north.
Image date: Autumn 1975.
NG Ref: SU466178.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 28″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

(74.2KB)

Navigation arch
Navigation arch

Looking south at the navigation arch of the old Chicken Hall railway bridge.
Image date: Autumn 1975. Image scanned from slide. © 2010 Charles Hockley. NG Ref: SU466177. WGS84: 50° 57′ 27″ N 1° 20′ 16″ W.

Navigation arch

Looking south at the navigation arch of the old Chicken Hall railway bridge.
Image date: Autumn 1975.
NG Ref: SU466177.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 27″ N 1° 20′ 16″ W.

(74.9KB)

Under the arch
Under the arch

Looking south under the navigation arch of the old Chicken Hall railway bridge.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466177. WGS84: 50° 57′ 27″ N 1° 20′ 16″ W.

Under the arch

Looking south under the navigation arch of the old Chicken Hall railway bridge.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU466177.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 27″ N 1° 20′ 16″ W.

(90.9KB)

Newly built bridge
Newly built bridge

Newly built replacement Chicken Hall railway bridge seen from the south.
Image date: 1979. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Len Durrant. NG Ref: SU465177. WGS84: 50° 57′ 27″ N 1° 20′ 18″ W.

Newly built bridge

Newly built replacement Chicken Hall railway bridge seen from the south.
Image date: 1979.
NG Ref: SU465177.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 27″ N 1° 20′ 18″ W.

(110.2KB)

North side of new bridge 40 years on
North side of new bridge 40 years on

The “new” Chicken Hall railway bridge seen from the north forty years after construction.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466177. WGS84: 50° 57′ 27″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

North side of new bridge 40 years on

The “new” Chicken Hall railway bridge seen from the north forty years after construction.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU466177.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 27″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

(124.2KB)

South side of new bridge 40 years on
South side of new bridge 40 years on

The “new” Chicken Hall railway bridge seen from the south forty years after construction.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465177. WGS84: 50° 57′ 27″ N 1° 20′ 18″ W.

South side of new bridge 40 years on

The “new” Chicken Hall railway bridge seen from the south forty years after construction.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU465177.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 27″ N 1° 20′ 18″ W.

(118.3KB)

Chicken Hall Railway Bridge to Lock House Lock

After some 50 yards from the railway, the footpath returns from the bed of the canal to the alignment of the original towing path on the east bank where it remains until Mansbridge Lock. In places this first stretch is rather “up and down” as the towpath embankment has suffered considerable erosion.

About 250 yards south of the railway bridge, a little used track or path crosses the canal bed to reach a small water treatment works that serves part of Eastleigh railway works. About 15 yards north of this track are the overgrown remains of an embankment constructed by the London and South Western Railway in the first decade of the 20th century. This was intended to form part of a diversion of the Eastleigh to Fareham line to avoid the then new extensions to Eastleigh railway works but construction seems to have ceased before crossing the main river to the east.

Contemporary Ordnance Survey mapping (revised in 1908) shows a railway track crossing the Navigation on a bridge but this was probably only a temporary structure for construction purposes to bring in building materials for the embankment and the bridges required to cross the Itchen valley. The next revision of the OS map in 1931 shows a shortened siding and no railway bridge but does show a footbridge across the bed of the canal in the same position as the present track/path.

In 1979 Eastleigh Borough Council bought 250 acres of water meadows along the eastern side of the waterway extending from here as far as Mans Bridge, which are now part of the Itchen Valley Country Park and have been designated as a nature reserve. Over 100 species of bird have been recorded, and the area is particularly attractive to warblers including Sedge Warbler and Whitethroat. There are a number of footpaths within the country park south of Decoy Covert accessible from the towing path which allow exploration of the water meadows.

The towing path for the last 300 yards before Lock House Lock runs along a bank about 8 to 10 feet above the meadows. A substantial dip in the towing path just upstream of the lock is the site of a set of hatches that used to feed water to the water meadows. The remains of a pond fed by these hatches can be seen south of the path.

Walk in the canal
Walk in the canal

For the first 50 yards, the path follows the bed of the canal but then regains the original towing path on the east bank for the first time since Fish House Bay.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465177. WGS84: 50° 57′ 27″ N 1° 20′ 18″ W.

Walk in the canal

For the first 50 yards, the path follows the bed of the canal but then regains the original towing path.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU465177.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 27″ N 1° 20′ 18″ W.

(99.4KB)

The towing path south of the railway
The towing path south of the railway

A reed bed lies east of the Navigation south of Chicken Hall railway bridge. The course of the canal is to the right of the path.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465177. WGS84: 50° 57′ 26″ N 1° 20′ 19″ W.

The towing path south of the railway

A reed bed lies east of the Navigation south of Chicken Hall railway bridge. The course of the canal is to the right of the path.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU465177.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 26″ N 1° 20′ 19″ W.

(87.5KB)

Track and site of railway siding
Track and site of railway siding

In the foreground a track crosses the Navigation whilst to the north the remains of an embankment lies hidden by the trees. No remains of any bridge have been found.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU464175. WGS84: 50° 57′ 21″ N 1° 20′ 23″ W.

Track and site of railway siding

In the foreground a track crosses the Navigation whilst to the north the remains of an embankment lies hidden by the trees.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU464175.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 21″ N 1° 20′ 23″ W.

(121.4KB)

Track and site of railway siding
Track and site of railway siding

A more recent view taken from the same position as the previous picture.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU464175. WGS84: 50° 57′ 21″ N 1° 20′ 23″ W.

Track and site of railway siding

A more recent view taken from the same position as the previous picture.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU464175.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 21″ N 1° 20′ 23″ W.

(80.0KB)

Water Treatment Works
Water Treatment Works

The water treatment works seen from the Itchen Way.
Image date: 27 Apr 2013. © 2013 Clive Richardson (cc-by-nc-nd/2.0). Image from www.flickr.com. NG Ref: SU464175. WGS84: 50° 57′ 21″ N 1° 20′ 23″ W.

Water Treatment Works

The water treatment works seen from the Itchen Way.
Image date: 27 Apr 2013.
NG Ref: SU464175.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 21″ N 1° 20′ 23″ W.

(123.3KB)

Where's the water?
Where's the water?

About 200 yards north of Lock House Lock the Navigation is in fairly good condition and almost looks as if it’s just waiting for water.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU464175. WGS84: 50° 57′ 20″ N 1° 20′ 23″ W.

Where's the water?

About 200 yards north of Lock House Lock the Navigation is in fairly good condition and almost looks as if it’s just waiting for water.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU464175.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 20″ N 1° 20′ 23″ W.

(109.0KB)

Above the meadows
Above the meadows

This length of waterway north of Lock House Lock is considerably above the level of the meadows to the east.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU463174. WGS84: 50° 57′ 17″ N 1° 20′ 27″ W.

Above the meadows

This length of waterway north of Lock House Lock is considerably above the level of the meadows to the east.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU463174.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 17″ N 1° 20′ 27″ W.

(100.0KB)

Path above the meadows
Path above the meadows

The towing path running above the level of the water meadows about 50 yards upstream of Lock House Lock.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2010 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU463174. WGS84: 50° 57′ 16″ N 1° 20′ 30″ W.

Path above the meadows

The towing path running above the level of the water meadows about 50 yards upstream of Lock House Lock.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU463174.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 16″ N 1° 20′ 30″ W.

(74.4KB)

Pond near Lock House Lock
Pond near Lock House Lock

A dip in the path just upstream of the lock marks the site of hatches which used to feed this pond. This in turn fed water to flood the adjacent water meadows.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU463174. WGS84: 50° 57′ 17″ N 1° 20′ 32″ W.

Pond near Lock House Lock

A dip in the path just upstream of the lock marks the site of hatches which used to feed this pond.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU463174.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 17″ N 1° 20′ 32″ W.

(108.5KB)

A number of the pictures on this page are shown by kind permission of Marie Keates. A keen walker, she has written about and illustrated several attempts to walk the full length of the Navigation during 2013 in her blog at http://www.iwalkalone.co.uk. She has walked along all or parts of the Navigation often since then: all illustrated with some excellent photographs.