Itchen Navigation: A Portrait

Brambridge - Allbrook

Distance: 0.9 mile (1.4 km)

Brambridge

Proceeding south, the towing path swaps from the west to the east bank at the road bridge in Kiln Lane, Brambridge. In less than 200 yards, the river and Navigation approach each other although they do not join apart from a small hatchway crossed by a footbridge. The two flow side by side for nearly a quarter of a mile with the towing path separating them.

As part of the Itchen Navigation Heritage Trail Project, repairs to the northern part of the footpath were undertaken during 2010.

The old Kiln Lane Bridge
The old Kiln Lane Bridge

The old wooden bridge in Kiln Lane, Brambridge from downstream.
Image date: 1891. Image from magic lantern slide. NG Ref: SU467224. WGS84: 50° 59′ 57″ N 1° 20′ 06″ W.

The old Kiln Lane Bridge

The old wooden bridge in Kiln Lane, Brambridge from downstream.
Image date: 1891.
NG Ref: SU467224.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 57″ N 1° 20′ 06″ W.

(84.7KB)

Modern Kiln Lane Bridge
Modern Kiln Lane Bridge

Today’s Navigation bridge at Brambridge from downstream.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU467224. WGS84: 50° 59′ 57″ N 1° 20′ 05″ W.

Modern Kiln Lane Bridge

Today’s Navigation bridge at Brambridge from downstream.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003.
NG Ref: SU467224.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 57″ N 1° 20′ 05″ W.

(109.0KB)

View from Kiln Lane Bridge
View from Kiln Lane Bridge

The view downstream from the Navigation bridge at Brambridge.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU467224. WGS84: 50° 59′ 58″ N 1° 20′ 06″ W.

View from Kiln Lane Bridge

The view downstream from the Navigation bridge at Brambridge.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU467224.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 58″ N 1° 20′ 06″ W.

(79.1KB)

Kiln Lane Bridge from downstream
Kiln Lane Bridge from downstream

The bridge in Kiln Lane, Brambridge from downstream.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU467223. WGS84: 50° 59′ 54″ N 1° 20′ 07″ W.

Kiln Lane Bridge from downstream

The bridge in Kiln Lane, Brambridge from downstream.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003.
NG Ref: SU467223.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 54″ N 1° 20′ 07″ W.

(95.1KB)

Footpath bridge 1976
Footpath bridge 1976

Seen from the south, the footbridge that used to span the former hatch below Kiln Lane.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU467222. WGS84: 50° 59′ 53″ N 1° 20′ 09″ W.

Footpath bridge 1976

Seen from the south, the footbridge that used to span the former hatch below Kiln Lane.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU467222.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 53″ N 1° 20′ 09″ W.

(105.9KB)

Footpath bridge 2019
Footpath bridge 2019

Looking downstream, the newer footbridge that spans the former hatch below Kiln Lane, with the river on the left and the Navigation on the right.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU467223. WGS84: 50° 59′ 54″ N 1° 20′ 08″ W.

Footpath bridge 2019

Looking downstream, the newer footbridge that spans the former hatch below Kiln Lane, with the river on the left and the Navigation on the right.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU467223.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 54″ N 1° 20′ 08″ W.

(78.2KB)

Brambridge Single Gates

The second half-lock on the Navigation, Brambridge Single Gates, is reached about 50 yards south of the footbridge. It is marked by a constriction in the canal’s banks and some of the brickwork can be seen but no weir has been inserted to replace the gates. As at Shawford, it is believed that this structure’s original purpose was to retain water levels for a mill that drew water from the Navigation. According to old maps there was a Brambridge Mill in 1810 but all trace had gone by 1869. It appears to have been just upstream of Bram Bridge over the main river (not the Navigation) near Brambridge House.

Brambridge Single Gates 1976
Brambridge Single Gates 1976

Site of Brambridge Single Gates from upstream.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466222. WGS84: 50° 59′ 52″ N 1° 20′ 09″ W.

Brambridge Single Gates 1976

Site of Brambridge Single Gates from upstream.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU466222.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 52″ N 1° 20′ 09″ W.

(106.1KB)

Brambridge Single Gates 1976
Brambridge Single Gates 1976

Site of Brambridge Single Gates from downstream.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466222. WGS84: 50° 59′ 51″ N 1° 20′ 10″ W.

Brambridge Single Gates 1976

Site of Brambridge Single Gates from downstream.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU466222.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 51″ N 1° 20′ 10″ W.

(87.7KB)

Brambridge Single Gates 2009
Brambridge Single Gates 2009

Site of Brambridge Single Gates from downstream.
Image date: 25 Sep 2009. © 2010 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466222. WGS84: 50° 59′ 50″ N 1° 20′ 10″ W.

Brambridge Single Gates 2009

Site of Brambridge Single Gates from downstream.
Image date: 25 Sep 2009.
NG Ref: SU466222.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 50″ N 1° 20′ 10″ W.

(122.9KB)

Brambridge Single Gates 2019
Brambridge Single Gates 2019

Site of Brambridge Single Gates from downstream.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466222. WGS84: 50° 59′ 51″ N 1° 20′ 10″ W.

Brambridge Single Gates 2019

Site of Brambridge Single Gates from downstream.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU466222.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 51″ N 1° 20′ 10″ W.

(72.8KB)

Brambridge Single Gates to Common Hatches

From the footbridge just north of the Single Gates, the main River Itchen and the Navigation run side by side for almost 400 yards. For much of this distance the two are separated by very little more than the width of the towing path.

When the Itchen Navigation Heritage Trail Project came to work on this length in 2010, the narrowness of the footpath meant that materials couldn’t be brought in along it. Instead, materials were delivered by road to an adjacent woodland copse, packed into individual 300kg bags. A mini-digger carried the bags one by one over a temporary trackway through the woodland, and loaded them into a flat bottomed boat at the water’s edge. The boat transported the materials downstream, again one at a time, to a mobile gantry, where they were unloaded and utilised by a second mini-digger. The Wildlife Trust admitted that “Boat transport was safer and lower-impact than using heavy machinery.” That demonstrates waterways transport can offer viable solutions.

At the point where the main river and canal part company and replacing earlier hatches are some modern ones, known as Common Hatches, discharging surplus water from the Navigation.

Below the Single Gates
Below the Single Gates

Looking downstream from near Brambridge Single Gates.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466221. WGS84: 50° 59′ 50″ N 1° 20′ 10″ W.

Below the Single Gates

Looking downstream from near Brambridge Single Gates.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003.
NG Ref: SU466221.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 50″ N 1° 20′ 10″ W.

(109.3KB)

Below the Single Gates
Below the Single Gates

Looking downstream from near Brambridge Single Gates.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466221. WGS84: 50° 59′ 50″ N 1° 20′ 10″ W.

Below the Single Gates

Looking downstream from near Brambridge Single Gates.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU466221.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 50″ N 1° 20′ 10″ W.

(71.1KB)

Amidst the water
Amidst the water

The path runs between the Navigation on the left and the River Itchen.
Image date: c1978. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465220. WGS84: 50° 59′ 45″ N 1° 20′ 16″ W.

Amidst the water

The path runs between the Navigation on the left and the River Itchen.
Image date: c1978.
NG Ref: SU465220.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 45″ N 1° 20′ 16″ W.

(93.8KB)

Between canal and river
Between canal and river

The path runs between the Navigation on the left and the River Itchen.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465220. WGS84: 50° 59′ 45″ N 1° 20′ 16″ W.

Between canal and river

The path runs between the Navigation on the left and the River Itchen.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003.
NG Ref: SU465220.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 45″ N 1° 20′ 16″ W.

(99.0KB)

Bringing in materials by boat
Bringing in materials by boat

Repairing the towing path. Bringing in materials by boat - that’s what waterways are for!
Image date: 2010. Image: Dennis Bright. NG Ref: SU465220. WGS84: 50° 59′ 44″ N 1° 20′ 18″ W.

Bringing in materials by boat

Repairing the towing path. Bringing in materials by boat - that’s what waterways are for!
Image date: 2010.
NG Ref: SU465220.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 44″ N 1° 20′ 18″ W.

(100.1KB)

Between canal and river
Between canal and river

The path runs between the Navigation on the left and the River Itchen.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465220. WGS84: 50° 59′ 45″ N 1° 20′ 16″ W.

Between canal and river

The path runs between the Navigation on the left and the River Itchen.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU465220.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 45″ N 1° 20′ 16″ W.

(75.9KB)

Common Hatches
Common Hatches

Modern sluices discharging water from the Navigation to the river.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465219. WGS84: 50° 59′ 43″ N 1° 20′ 19″ W.

Common Hatches

Modern sluices discharging water from the Navigation to the river.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU465219.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 43″ N 1° 20′ 19″ W.

(85.1KB)

Common Hatches
Common Hatches

Modern sluices discharging water from the Navigation to the river.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465219. WGS84: 50° 59′ 43″ N 1° 20′ 19″ W.

Common Hatches

Modern sluices discharging water from the Navigation to the river.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU465219.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 43″ N 1° 20′ 19″ W.

(69.5KB)

The embankment and waterway breaches

A short distance south of these hatches, the waterway begins to run on top of an embankment for over quarter of a mile. This feature, although not very conspicuous, is the biggest earthwork encountered along the Navigation. At its greatest height, this embankment is about 5 or 6 feet high. Whilst not as high as the London to Southampton railway embankment a little way to the west, it was a considerable feat of engineering for the early 18th century. Apart from the presence of the railway, this stretch is quite remote.

The towing path along here is now in reasonably good condition. However, in April 2003, the water was overflowing the offside bank in four or five places - there was a serious danger that the embankment could breach and badly damage the waterway and cause flooding.

In the winter of 2012/3, overflowing water caused a breach in the towing path bank a little south of the sluices at a point that had been prone to such breaches in the past. Repair work was completed in October 2013 - about ten months after the breach. Flooding from rains during the Christmas period of 2013 and the following months threatened to undo some of this work with water often overflowing the towing path.

In the sections of this portrait upstream of here, mention is made of the alterations made to improve water flow at Malm and College Mead Locks. It would seem though that similar measures were not taken to deal with increased flows in the Navigation below College Mead Lock. This seems to have resulted in a situation where the Navigation can rise onto or even over the banks. Hopefully a solution has been found as far as the pound between Brambridge and Allbrook Locks is concerned although above Brambridge still seems to have problems.

Finally a repair was made at the beginning of 2015. This comprises a spill weir built into the towing path bank with a footbridge over it. When water levels rise, surplus water will be able to spill over the weir to run to the main river which is about 40 yards away. This method of water control seems not have been employed on the Navigation before (apart from a very small capacity example south of Allbrook Lock) although common on more modern waterways. Historically, the Itchen Navigation appears to have relied upon having men with intimate knowledge of the waterway who could regulate levels day to day by setting the hatches to deal with conditions. Today, this is option is not readily available.

A breach in the bank
A breach in the bank

A breach in the towing path bank south of Common Hatches.
Image date: 18 Mar 2013. © Shazz (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU464218. WGS84: 50° 59′ 39″ N 1° 20′ 23″ W.

A breach in the bank

A breach in the towing path bank south of Common Hatches.
Image date: 18 Mar 2013.
NG Ref: SU464218.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 39″ N 1° 20′ 23″ W.

(104.8KB)

Water flooding over the path
Water flooding over the path

Water flooding over the path after heavy rains during the Christmas period.
Image date: 29 Dec 2013. © 2014 Marie Keates. Image from www.iwalkalone.co.uk. NG Ref: SU464218. WGS84: 50° 59′ 39″ N 1° 20′ 23″ W.

Water flooding over the path

Water flooding over the path after heavy rains during the Christmas period.
Image date: 29 Dec 2013.
NG Ref: SU464218.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 39″ N 1° 20′ 23″ W.

(117.5KB)

Spill weir
Spill weir

This footbridge has been constructed over a new spill weir which allows surplus water to run off into the adjacent river.
Image date: 12 May 2015. Image by unknown photographer. NG Ref: SU464218. WGS84: 50° 59′ 39″ N 1° 20′ 23″ W.

Spill weir

This footbridge has been constructed over a new spill weir which allows surplus water to run off into the adjacent river.
Image date: 12 May 2015.
NG Ref: SU464218.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 39″ N 1° 20′ 23″ W.

(60.6KB)

Spill weir
Spill weir

Another view of the footbridge constructed over the new spill weir.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU464218. WGS84: 50° 59′ 39″ N 1° 20′ 23″ W.

Spill weir

Another view of the footbridge constructed over the new spill weir.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU464218.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 39″ N 1° 20′ 23″ W.

(62.9KB)

On the embankment
On the embankment

Looking south at the Navigation running on top of its embankment.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU463216. WGS84: 50° 59′ 33″ N 1° 20′ 28″ W.

On the embankment

Looking south at the Navigation running on top of its embankment.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003.
NG Ref: SU463216.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 33″ N 1° 20′ 28″ W.

(78.0KB)

On the embankment
On the embankment

The Navigation running on top of its embankment looking back towards Brambridge.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU463215. WGS84: 50° 59′ 29″ N 1° 20′ 30″ W.

On the embankment

The Navigation running on top of its embankment looking back towards Brambridge.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003.
NG Ref: SU463215.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 29″ N 1° 20′ 30″ W.

(108.4KB)

The embankment
The embankment

The embankment carrying the Navigation above the water meadows.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU463215. WGS84: 50° 59′ 29″ N 1° 20′ 30″ W.

The embankment

The embankment carrying the Navigation above the water meadows.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003.
NG Ref: SU463215.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 29″ N 1° 20′ 30″ W.

(109.1KB)

The embankment to Allbrook Lock

In the late 1970s and early 80s, volunteers working with Eastleigh Borough and Hampshire County Councils made repairs to the path along this section of the waterway. At that time, for over 200 yards, the towing path was wide enough for a horse and cart as part of an access to the land east of the embankment. It seems that erosion has been making parts of this path narrower.

Repairing the path
Repairing the path

Volunteers repairing the path at the south end of the embankment on a murky day.
Image date: 24 Feb 1980. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU462214. WGS84: 50° 59′ 26″ N 1° 20′ 32″ W.

Repairing the path

Volunteers repairing the path at the south end of the embankment on a murky day.
Image date: 24 Feb 1980.
NG Ref: SU462214.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 26″ N 1° 20′ 32″ W.

(53.4KB)

Site of the repair
Site of the repair

The same place as the repair shown in the previous picture but 39 years later.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU462214. WGS84: 50° 59′ 26″ N 1° 20′ 32″ W.

Site of the repair

The same place as the repair shown in the previous picture but 39 years later.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU462214.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 26″ N 1° 20′ 32″ W.

(107.4KB)

Repairs south of the embankment
Repairs south of the embankment

New repairs to the path south of the embankment.
Image date: 24 Feb 1980. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU462213. WGS84: 50° 59′ 21″ N 1° 20′ 34″ W.

Repairs south of the embankment

New repairs to the path south of the embankment.
Image date: 24 Feb 1980.
NG Ref: SU462213.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 21″ N 1° 20′ 34″ W.

(74.9KB)

South of the embankment
South of the embankment

The Navigation south of the embankment and looking south.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU462214. WGS84: 50° 59′ 25″ N 1° 20′ 32″ W.

South of the embankment

The Navigation south of the embankment and looking south.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003.
NG Ref: SU462214.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 25″ N 1° 20′ 32″ W.

(112.2KB)

Autumn south of embankment
Autumn south of embankment

The Navigation south of the embankment and looking north.
Image date: 15 Oct 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU462213. WGS84: 50° 59′ 22″ N 1° 20′ 33″ W.

Autumn south of embankment

The Navigation south of the embankment and looking north.
Image date: 15 Oct 2003.
NG Ref: SU462213.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 22″ N 1° 20′ 33″ W.

(143.2KB)

South of the embankment
South of the embankment

The Navigation south of the embankment and looking north.
Image date: 21 Apr 2015. © 2015 Marie Keates. Image from www.iwalkalone.co.uk. NG Ref: SU462212. WGS84: 50° 59′ 20″ N 1° 20′ 34″ W.

South of the embankment

The Navigation south of the embankment and looking north.
Image date: 21 Apr 2015.
NG Ref: SU462212.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 20″ N 1° 20′ 34″ W.

(105.2KB)

Above Allbrook Lock 1976
Above Allbrook Lock 1976

North of Allbrook Lock looking north.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU462212. WGS84: 50° 59′ 19″ N 1° 20′ 35″ W.

Above Allbrook Lock 1976

North of Allbrook Lock looking north.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU462212.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 19″ N 1° 20′ 35″ W.

(117.4KB)

Above Allbrook Lock 2019
Above Allbrook Lock 2019

North of Allbrook Lock looking north.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU462212. WGS84: 50° 59′ 20″ N 1° 20′ 35″ W.

Above Allbrook Lock 2019

North of Allbrook Lock looking north.
Image date: 16 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU462212.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 20″ N 1° 20′ 35″ W.

(98.1KB)

Allbrook Lock

At the southern end of this length of canal lies Allbrook Lock. This structure is quite different from the locks encountered elsewhere on this Navigation being constructed in the late 1830s to replace the original lock obliterated by the construction of the London & Southampton Railway. It is constructed in the more normal manner entirely of brick and until the 1990s was in reasonably good condition.

A weir that is used to measure the flow of water in the Navigation now replaces the top gates but the anchors in the stonework that secured the top of the heel post of the gates are still present. In the 1990s, the water authority installed a fish ladder in the lock chamber and in the process caused considerable damage to the wall on the west side of the chamber although this seems to have been re-instated. At around the same time a footbridge that crossed the head of the lock was removed. Allbrook Bridge, carrying the main road (B3335) from Eastleigh to Twyford, has been widened and encroaches upon the tail of the lock.

Coming south from Brambridge, the Navigation’s original course carried straight on where it now bears left to come to the present lock structure. The modern course rejoins the original canal downstream immediately west of the railway bridge - between it and the Nuttall plant hire depot. The course of the road was also altered by the coming of the railway: it originally ran in nearly a straight line from Allbrook towards Highbridge crossing the present waterway about 10 yards north of the head of the new lock structure. The original lock was south of the old road and is now under the eastern tracks of the railway embankment on the south side of the railway bridge over the present road.

An Ordnance Survey map revised in 1895 shows that most of the lock chamber was covered by a roof. This was probably associated with the timber yards and saw mills on the other side of the road. The map revised in 1931 shows the roof to have disappeared.

The head of Allbrook Lock
The head of Allbrook Lock

The head of Allbrook Lock seen from upstream after some vegetation clearance. Before the railway was built, the waterway went straight on to the right of the present lock.
Image date: 15 Oct 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU461211. WGS84: 50° 59′ 16″ N 1° 20′ 38″ W.

The head of Allbrook Lock

The head of Allbrook Lock seen from upstream after some vegetation clearance.
Image date: 15 Oct 2003.
NG Ref: SU461211.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 16″ N 1° 20′ 38″ W.

(143.6KB)

Weir at Allbrook Lock
Weir at Allbrook Lock

The head of Allbrook Lock showing the weir used for water flow measurement.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU461211. WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

Weir at Allbrook Lock

The head of Allbrook Lock showing the weir used for water flow measurement.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003.
NG Ref: SU461211.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

(96.8KB)

Meter house for the weir
Meter building for the weir

This tiny building houses the recording equipment for measurements of depth of flow over the weir.
Image date: 8 Nov 2017. © 2017 Keith Murray (cc-by-nc-nd/2.0). Image from www.flickr.com. NG Ref: SU461211. WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

Meter building for the weir

This tiny building houses the recording equipment for measurements of depth of flow over the weir.
Image date: 8 Nov 2017.
NG Ref: SU461211.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

(93.4KB)

Gate anchor at Allbrook Lock
Gate anchor at Allbrook Lock

Iron anchor at head of Allbrook Lock used as part of a “hinge” for a top gate.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU461211. WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

Gate anchor at Allbrook Lock

Iron anchor at head of Allbrook Lock used as part of a “hinge” for a top gate.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003.
NG Ref: SU461211.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

(112.2KB)

Chamber of Allbrook Lock
Chamber of Allbrook Lock

Chamber of Allbrook Lock looking downstream.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU461211. WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

Chamber of Allbrook Lock

Chamber of Allbrook Lock looking downstream.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU461211.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

(96.4KB)

Chamber of Allbrook Lock
Chamber of Allbrook Lock

Chamber of Allbrook Lock looking downstream.
Image date: 15 Oct 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU461211. WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

Chamber of Allbrook Lock

Chamber of Allbrook Lock looking downstream.
Image date: 15 Oct 2003.
NG Ref: SU461211.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

(106.2KB)

Head of Allbrook Lock
Head of Allbrook Lock

A couple viewing the lock. What they are stood on looks too flimsy to be the original gates.
Image date: Probably before 1914. Image: Hampshire Museum Services. NG Ref: SU461211. WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

Head of Allbrook Lock

A couple viewing the lock.
Image date: Probably before 1914.
NG Ref: SU461211.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

(53.2KB)

Chamber of Allbrook Lock 1931
Chamber of Allbrook Lock 1931

A view from the road bridge looking towards the head of the lock.
Image date: 1931. Image: Origin unknown. NG Ref: SU461210. WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

Chamber of Allbrook Lock 1931

A view from the road bridge looking towards the head of the lock.
Image date: 1931.
NG Ref: SU461210.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

(64.7KB)

Chamber of Allbrook Lock
Chamber of Allbrook Lock

The chamber of Allbrook Lock seen from the road bridge.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from print of now lost slide. © 2010 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU461210. WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

Chamber of Allbrook Lock

The chamber of Allbrook Lock seen from the road bridge.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU461210.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

(128.3KB)

Chamber of Allbrook Lock
Chamber of Allbrook Lock

The chamber of Allbrook Lock seen from the road bridge at a time of low water flow.
Image date: 15 Oct 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU461210. WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

Chamber of Allbrook Lock

The chamber of Allbrook Lock seen from the road bridge at a time of low water flow.
Image date: 15 Oct 2003.
NG Ref: SU461210.
WGS84: 50° 59′ 15″ N 1° 20′ 39″ W.

(87.4KB)

B3335 Highbridge Road

To continue south along the waterway, pedestrians have to cross Highbridge Road (B3335). Great care should be exercised as the road bends quite sharply as it crosses the Navigation having passed under the railway and continues towards Highbridge and Twyford.

There used to be a public house (the Victoria) the other side of the railway bridge but this closed and was eventually demolished in 2006 and the land has now been redeveloped.

Some of the pictures on this page are shown by kind permission of Marie Keates. A keen walker, she has written about and illustrated several attempts to walk the full length of the Navigation during 2013 in her blog at http://www.iwalkalone.co.uk. She has walked along all or parts of the Navigation often since then: all illustrated with some excellent photographs.