Itchen Navigation: A Portrait

Bishopstoke - Fish House Bay

Distance: 0.4 mile (0.6 km)

The Itchen Way along the Navigation between Bishopstoke and Mansbridge is currently the least well used section of the path and as a result is walkable but unkempt and less “cared for”. After wet weather, the path can be quite muddy. Also it should be pointed out that the walk between these two places is over three miles and that it is almost impossible to gain access to, or leave, the path en route. It is possible to access or leave the path at Fish House Bay or via the Itchen Valley Country Park visitor centre across the meadows but this latter may be wetter/muddier and no shorter than the Itchen Way.

Stoke Bridge to Coneger Lock

South of Bishopstoke, the Navigation passes across an area of fairly open water meadows. The channel on the length to Fish House Bay is narrower than it was in the days of navigation as water levels today are lower than they once were. Both banks consist of embankments up to about 4 feet high in which the remains of various hatches can be found. At least one of these was faced with finely dressed stonework. Some 100 yards from Stoke Bridge, a modern culvert was built under the path, together with a strange wire mesh contraption over its entrance, in about 2009. This feeds a modern ditch dug through the adjacent meadow. A noticeboard was erected which should explain about this.

About 200 yards south of the road, the towing path bank had become very overgrown some years ago, much of it with hawthorn. As a result, in places walkers had to resort to taking to the side of the bank of the canal. However, in recent years, a walkable path has been cleared past the bushes.

As one approaches the lock, the level of the water in the canal drops lower in relation to the path because part of the lock ahead has collapsed allowing the flow of water to erode the bed into a series of “rapids”.

Looking down the path to Southampton
Looking down the path to Southampton

Looking south from Stoke Bridge towards Southampton. The distances on the sign are misleading: they are to Woodmill but the centre of Southampton is at least 2 miles (3 km) further.
Image date: 27 Apr 2013. © 2013 Clive Richardson (cc-by-nc-nd/2.0). Image from www.flickr.com. NG Ref: SU464191. WGS84: 50° 58′ 12″ N 1° 20′ 25″ W.

Looking down the path to Southampton

Looking south from Stoke Bridge towards Southampton.
Image date: 27 Apr 2013.
NG Ref: SU464191.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 12″ N 1° 20′ 25″ W.

(94.7KB)

Stoke Bridge
Stoke Bridge

Stoke Bridge from downstream.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU464191. WGS84: 50° 58′ 11″ N 1° 20′ 25″ W.

Stoke Bridge

Stoke Bridge from downstream.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU464191.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 11″ N 1° 20′ 25″ W.

(94.5KB)

Looking south from Stoke Bridge
Looking south from Stoke Bridge

Looking south down the Navigation from Stoke Bridge.
Image date: 25 Oct 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU464191. WGS84: 50° 58′ 12″ N 1° 20′ 25″ W.

Looking south from Stoke Bridge

Looking south down the Navigation from Stoke Bridge.
Image date: 25 Oct 2003.
NG Ref: SU464191.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 12″ N 1° 20′ 25″ W.

(85.2KB)

View south in 1975
View south in 1975

The view south towards Conegar Lock showing the unfenced and raised embankment for the towing path.
Image date: Autumn 1975. Image scanned from negative. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU464191. WGS84: 50° 58′ 11″ N 1° 20′ 24″ W.

View south in 1975

The view south towards Conegar Lock showing the unfenced and raised embankment for the towing path.
Image date: Autumn 1975.
NG Ref: SU464191.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 11″ N 1° 20′ 24″ W.

(52.4KB)

Modern culvert
Modern culvert

The grating over the entry to a modern culvert under the towing path to feed the new ditch in the adjoining meadow.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU464190. WGS84: 50° 58′ 09″ N 1° 20′ 24″ W.

Modern culvert

The grating over the entry to a modern culvert under the towing path to feed the new ditch in the adjoining meadow.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU464190.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 09″ N 1° 20′ 24″ W.

(102.3KB)

Former hatch
Former hatch

In the 1970s, this former hatch under the towing path was plainly visible and faced with finely dressed stonework.
Image date: c1977. Image scanned from slide. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU464190. WGS84: 50° 58′ 07″ N 1° 20′ 24″ W.

Former hatch

In the 1970s, this former hatch under the towing path was plainly visible and faced with finely dressed stonework.
Image date: c1977.
NG Ref: SU464190.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 07″ N 1° 20′ 24″ W.

(50.5KB)

Former hatch
Former hatch

By the turn of the century, after the path was fenced off from the meadow, this former hatch under the towing path was and remains barely visible but is still faced with finely dressed stonework.
Image date: 25 Oct 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU464190. WGS84: 50° 58′ 07″ N 1° 20′ 24″ W.

Former hatch

By the turn of the century, after the path was fenced off from the meadow, this former hatch under the towing path was and remains barely visible.
Image date: 25 Oct 2003.
NG Ref: SU464190.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 07″ N 1° 20′ 24″ W.

(138.8KB)

South of Stoke Bridge
South of Stoke Bridge

Between Conegar Lock and Stoke Bridge - the latter is visible in the distance.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU464189. WGS84: 50° 58′ 06″ N 1° 20′ 24″ W.

South of Stoke Bridge

Between Conegar Lock and Stoke Bridge - the latter is visible in the distance.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU464189.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 06″ N 1° 20′ 24″ W.

(71.1KB)

Overgrown path
Overgrown path

A few yards further south, the towing path embankment was once so overgrown by the hawthorn on the left - walkers here had to walk on the bed of the canal.
Image date: 25 Sep 2009. © 2010 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU464189. WGS84: 50° 58′ 06″ N 1° 20′ 24″ W.

Overgrown path

The former overgrown path between Conegar Lock and Stoke Bridge.
Image date: 25 Sep 2009.
NG Ref: SU464189.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 06″ N 1° 20′ 24″ W.

(108.6KB)

Path now walkable
Path now walkable

In recent years a walkable path has been cleared.
Image date: 11 Jun 2017. © 2017 Marie Keates. Image from www.iwalkalone.co.uk. NG Ref: SU464190. WGS84: 50° 58′ 07″ N 1° 20′ 24″ W.

Path now walkable

In recent years a walkable path has been cleared.
Image date: 11 Jun 2017.
NG Ref: SU464190.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 07″ N 1° 20′ 24″ W.

(94.1KB)

Itchen “rapids”
Itchen “rapids”

One of the “rapids” in the bed of the canal caused by the collapse of the top cill at Conegar Lock.
Image date: 21 Apr 2015. © 2015 Marie Keates. Image from www.iwalkalone.co.uk. NG Ref: SU464189. WGS84: 50° 58′ 05″ N 1° 20′ 22″ W.

Itchen “rapids”

One of the “rapids” in the bed of the canal caused by the collapse of the top cill at Conegar Lock.
Image date: 21 Apr 2015.
NG Ref: SU464189.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 05″ N 1° 20′ 22″ W.

(155.6KB)

Conegar Lock

About 350 yards from Bishopstoke Road, the remains of Conegar Lock can be found. The lock was sometimes also known as Coneger, Coneygear or Stoke Conygar Lock. The name derives from "coney garth": an artificial rabbit warren, often medieval in origin and used to supply meat for the lord of the manor. However, whilst there was such a warren on the north side of Bishopstoke belonging to the Bishop of Winchester, there does not appear to have been one near the lock.

This lock is probably the best preserved of the turf sided locks on the Itchen Navigation. Much of the area of the lock, particularly around the head, has become very overgrown by bushes and trees in the last twenty or so years. Indeed, there is a danger that within a few years this area could become impassable. Formerly, substantial amounts of masonry could be seen at the head of the lock but this is now very difficult to find or see. On the offside of the waterway, some fine stonework provides the setting for a hatch that was used for drowning the water meadows on the east side of the Navigation. There is also a fine brick arched culvert passing under the towing path just above the lock which served a similar purpose but it is now fenced off and hidden by vegetation.

The “upper apron” or top cill (the vertical step in the bed of the Navigation overcome by the lock) has collapsed and been almost completely washed away. Indeed, a report of 1863 said that it was then about to disintegrate. This has led to erosion of the bed of the canal above the lock into a series of “rapids” for some distance upstream. This has exaggerated the height of the banks considerably.

Until around 30 years ago, the "turf sided" chamber had well defined sloping, earthen banks on both sides of the lock. However, that on the east side was destroyed in the late 1980s. An unusual feature of this lock is the brick walling at the foot of these slopes which would have been installed to prevent erosion when the lock chamber was being filled. It was more usual for a wooden structure to be built for this purpose. It is possible that vertical baulks of timber would also have been positioned above the walling to prevent boats settling on the sloping sides as the lock was emptied although there is no evidence that these ever existed here.

A modern footbridge uses the well-preserved brickwork at the tail of the lock which once supported the bottom gates. The path crosses from the west to the east bank of the waterway. When the canal was commercially used, there used to be a wooden horse bridge below the lock to carry the towing path across the waterway.

Head of Conegar Lock
Head of Conegar Lock

Area around the head of Conegar Lock showing one of the “rapids” in the eroded canal bed. The squatting photographer was taking the next picture.
Image date: Autumn 1975. Image scanned from slide. © 2010 Charles Hockley. NG Ref: SU465188. WGS84: 50° 58′ 03″ N 1° 20′ 21″ W.

Head of Conegar Lock

Area around the head of Conegar Lock showing one of the “rapids” in the eroded canal bed.
Image date: Autumn 1975.
NG Ref: SU465188.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 03″ N 1° 20′ 21″ W.

(99.8KB)

Culvert near head of Conegar Lock
Culvert near head of Conegar Lock

This culvert still passes under the towing path a few yards upstream of the lock. This view from the waterway side of the path is not possible today due to tree growth.
Image date: Autumn 1975. Image scanned from negative. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465188. WGS84: 50° 58′ 03″ N 1° 20′ 21″ W.

Culvert near head of Conegar Lock

This culvert seen from the waterway side passes under the towing path a few yards upstream of the lock.
Image date: Autumn 1975.
NG Ref: SU465188.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 03″ N 1° 20′ 21″ W.

(66.1KB)

Culvert near head of Conegar Lock
Culvert near head of Conegar Lock

This culvert still passes under the towing path a few yards upstream of the lock. This view from the landward side of the path is not possible today due to barbed wire fencing.
Image date: Autumn 1975. Image scanned from negative. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU464188. WGS84: 50° 58′ 03″ N 1° 20′ 21″ W.

Culvert near head of Conegar Lock

This culvert seen from the landward side still passes under the towing path a few yards upstream of the lock.
Image date: Autumn 1975.
NG Ref: SU464188.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 03″ N 1° 20′ 21″ W.

(78.2KB)

Offside of head of Conegar Lock
Offside of head of Conegar Lock

Fine stonework at the lead into the head of Conegar Lock complete with hatchway used to drown the meadows east of the Navigation.
Image date: Autumn 1975. Image scanned from negative. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465188. WGS84: 50° 58′ 03″ N 1° 20′ 21″ W.

Offside of head of Conegar Lock

Fine stonework at the lead into the head of Conegar Lock complete with hatchway used to drown the meadows east of the Navigation.
Image date: Autumn 1975.
NG Ref: SU465188.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 03″ N 1° 20′ 21″ W.

(75.1KB)

Offside of head of Conegar Lock
Offside of head of Conegar Lock

Hopefully, the stonework at the head of Conegar Lock is still there under this overgrowth.
Image date: 25 Oct 2003. © 2010 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465188. WGS84: 50° 58′ 03″ N 1° 20′ 21″ W.

Offside of head of Conegar Lock

Hopefully, the stonework at the head of Conegar Lock is still there under this overgrowth.
Image date: 25 Oct 2003.
NG Ref: SU465188.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 03″ N 1° 20′ 21″ W.

(138.7KB)

Offside of head of Conegar Lock
Offside of head of Conegar Lock

Remaining brickwork on the offside of the lock where one of the top gates was hung viewed from within the lock chamber.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465188. WGS84: 50° 58′ 02″ N 1° 20′ 20″ W.

Offside of head of Conegar Lock

Remaining brickwork on the offside of the lock where one of the top gates was hung.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU465188.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 02″ N 1° 20′ 20″ W.

(99.7KB)

Tail of Conegar Lock
Tail of Conegar Lock

Tail of Conegar Lock viewed from within the chamber.
Image date: 25 Oct 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465188. WGS84: 50° 58′ 02″ N 1° 20′ 20″ W.

Tail of Conegar Lock

Tail of Conegar Lock viewed from within the chamber.
Image date: 25 Oct 2003.
NG Ref: SU465188.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 02″ N 1° 20′ 20″ W.

(126.6KB)

Turf sided lock
Turf sided lock

Sloping turf bank on the east side of Conegar Lock with brick retaining wall. The earthen bank on that side has now been removed although most of the brickwork remains.
Image date: c1978. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465188. WGS84: 50° 58′ 02″ N 1° 20′ 20″ W.

Turf sided lock

Sloping turf bank on the east side of Conegar Lock with brick retaining wall.
Image date: c1978.
NG Ref: SU465188.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 02″ N 1° 20′ 20″ W.

(108.6KB)

Sloping turf side removed
Sloping turf side removed

The sloping turf bank on the east side of Conegar Lock no longer exists although most of the brickwork remains.
Image date: 21 Apr 2015. © 2015 Marie Keates. Image from www.iwalkalone.co.uk. NG Ref: SU465188. WGS84: 50° 58′ 02″ N 1° 20′ 20″ W.

Sloping turf side removed

The sloping turf bank on the east side of Conegar Lock no longer exists although most of the brickwork remains.
Image date: 21 Apr 2015.
NG Ref: SU465188.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 02″ N 1° 20′ 20″ W.

(105.0KB)

Chamber of Conegar Lock
Chamber of Conegar Lock

Chamber of Conegar Lock viewed from footbridge at the tail.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465188. WGS84: 50° 58′ 02″ N 1° 20′ 20″ W.

Chamber of Conegar Lock

Chamber of Conegar Lock viewed from footbridge at the tail.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU465188.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 02″ N 1° 20′ 20″ W.

(95.6KB)

The footbridge
The footbridge

The footbridge at the tail of the lock.
Image date: 3 May 2014. © 2014 Marie Keates. Image from www.iwalkalone.co.uk. NG Ref: SU465188. WGS84: 50° 58′ 02″ N 1° 20′ 20″ W.

The footbridge

The footbridge at the tail of the lock.
Image date: 3 May 2014.
NG Ref: SU465188.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 02″ N 1° 20′ 20″ W.

(117.9KB)

The footbridge
The footbridge

The footbridge at the tail of the lock in 1975.
Image date: Autumn 1975. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Charles Hockley. NG Ref: SU465188. WGS84: 50° 58′ 01″ N 1° 20′ 19″ W.

The footbridge

The footbridge at the tail of the lock in 1975.
Image date: Autumn 1975.
NG Ref: SU465188.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 01″ N 1° 20′ 19″ W.

(91.5KB)

Conegar Lock to Fish House Bay

Having crossed the waterway to the east bank by means of the footbridge at the tail of the lock, the towing path continues in a southerly direction towards Fish House Bay. In the late 1980s, alterations to the original path were made. It seems that the raised chalk bank on which the unfenced path ran was used to fill the counter drain that used to run along the east side of the path. In turn the path was confined by a fence to a course closer to the waterway. Now the path is at times rather narrow and can be rather muddy although some minor improvements have been made in recent years.

Conegar Lock hidden
Conegar Lock hidden

Looking upstream with Conegar Lock hidden in the trees.
Image date: 25 Oct 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465188. WGS84: 50° 58′ 00″ N 1° 20′ 18″ W.

Conegar Lock hidden

Looking upstream with Conegar Lock hidden in the trees.
Image date: 25 Oct 2003.
NG Ref: SU465188.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 00″ N 1° 20′ 18″ W.

(90.1KB)

Conegar Lock obscured
Conegar Lock obscured

Looking upstream towards Conegar Lock hidden by the trees with now some even growing in the silted channel.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465188. WGS84: 50° 58′ 00″ N 1° 20′ 18″ W.

Conegar Lock obscured

Looking upstream towards Conegar Lock hidden by the trees with now some even growing in the silted channel.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU465188.
WGS84: 50° 58′ 00″ N 1° 20′ 18″ W.

(97.8KB)

Path south of Conegar Lock
Path south of Conegar Lock

Looking upstream towards Conegar Lock. The remains of part of the old towing path lie between the tree and the fence.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU465187. WGS84: 50° 57′ 58″ N 1° 20′ 17″ W.

Path south of Conegar Lock

The remains of part of the old towing path lie between the tree and the fence.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU465187.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 58″ N 1° 20′ 17″ W.

(94.2KB)

Ford across canal
Ford across canal

Modern ford crossing Navigation between Conegar Lock and Fish House Bay.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466186. WGS84: 50° 57′ 56″ N 1° 20′ 16″ W.

Ford across canal

Modern ford crossing Navigation between Conegar Lock and Fish House Bay.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU466186.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 56″ N 1° 20′ 16″ W.

(64.8KB)

Muddy path
Muddy path

The path south of the ford used to become waterlogged when water levels were high.
Image date: 3 May 2014. © 2014 Marie Keates. Image from www.iwalkalone.co.uk. NG Ref: SU466186. WGS84: 50° 57′ 56″ N 1° 20′ 16″ W.

Muddy path

The path south of the ford used to become waterlogged when water levels were high.
Image date: 3 May 2014.
NG Ref: SU466186.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 56″ N 1° 20′ 16″ W.

(116.8KB)

Repaired path
Repaired path

The path south of the ford has recently been repaired.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466186. WGS84: 50° 57′ 56″ N 1° 20′ 16″ W.

Repaired path

The path south of the ford has recently been repaired.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU466186.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 56″ N 1° 20′ 16″ W.

(75.9KB)

Above Fish House Bay
Above Fish House Bay

Navigation and towing path looking north just upstream of Fish House Bay.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466186. WGS84: 50° 57′ 54″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

Above Fish House Bay

Navigation and towing path looking north just upstream of Fish House Bay.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU466186.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 54″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

(93.6KB)

Narrow path
Narrow path

The path between the modern ford and Fish House Bay is now fenced and considerably narrower than before the 1980s.
Image date: 15 Jun 2013. © 2013 Marie Keates. Image from www.iwalkalone.co.uk. NG Ref: SU466186. WGS84: 50° 57′ 54″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

Narrow path

The path between the modern ford and Fish House Bay is now fenced and considerably narrower than before the 1980s.
Image date: 15 Jun 2013.
NG Ref: SU466186.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 54″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

(131.7KB)

Fish House Bay

Nearly 300 yards south of Conegar Lock, at Fish House Bay, the Barton River (which left the Navigation upstream of Stoke Lock) rejoins the Navigation, only to cross and leave again almost immediately to join the main River Itchen to the south east. The footpath used to cross the Barton River as it left the Navigation by means of a plank bridge with a handrail. Some years ago this was replaced by a more substantial footbridge on a slightly different alignment. Although the position of the north end is unchanged, the southern end of the new bridge was moved west a few yards and is now within the dry course of the Navigation.

It is recorded that there were hatches and a horse bridge on this site. However, the hatches, which retained a higher water level, were destroyed towards the end of the 19th century in order to drain the Navigation to the south. The result is that the artificial waterway from here almost as far south as Mans Bridge became ‘dry’ although some parts can still get quite waterlogged. It also meant that part of the supply to drown the water meadows to the south was removed.

Fish House Bay
Fish House Bay

This view shows the Navigation looking south at Fish House Bay with the Barton River joining from the right behind the willow. Summer growth obscures the allotments on the west bank.
Image date: Autumn 1975. Image scanned from negative. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466186. WGS84: 50° 57′ 54″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

Fish House Bay

This view shows the Navigation looking south at Fish House Bay with the Barton River joining from the right behind the willow.
Image date: Autumn 1975.
NG Ref: SU466186.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 54″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

(68.0KB)

Allotments at Fish House Bay
Allotments at Fish House Bay

About seven months later and a few yards further south than the previous picture, this shows the allotments more clearly. The allotments were removed in the 1980s.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466186. WGS84: 50° 57′ 54″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

Allotments at Fish House Bay

About seven months later and a few yards further south than the previous picture, this shows the allotments more clearly.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU466186.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 54″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

(80.4KB)

Junction with Barton River
Junction with Barton River

Looking due west across the Navigation at the Barton River which is almost totally obscured by tree growth even without leaves.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466185. WGS84: 50° 57′ 53″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

Junction with Barton River

Looking due west across the Navigation at the Barton River which is almost totally obscured by tree growth.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU466185.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 53″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

(92.9KB)

Fish House Bay
Fish House Bay

Looking upstream at Fish House Bay from the older footbridge.
Image date: 28 May 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466185. WGS84: 50° 57′ 52″ N 1° 20′ 14″ W.

Fish House Bay

Looking upstream at Fish House Bay from the older footbridge.
Image date: 28 May 1976.
NG Ref: SU466185.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 52″ N 1° 20′ 14″ W.

(75.4KB)

Fish House Bay obscured
Fish House Bay obscured

Fish House Bay seen from the southern end of the modern footbridge.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466185. WGS84: 50° 57′ 52″ N 1° 20′ 14″ W.

Fish House Bay obscured

Fish House Bay seen from the southern end of the modern footbridge.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU466185.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 52″ N 1° 20′ 14″ W.

(95.0KB)

Fish House Bay footbridge
Fish House Bay footbridge

Footbridge at Fish House Bay seen from the track to the south.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU466185. WGS84: 50° 57′ 52″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

Fish House Bay footbridge

Footbridge at Fish House Bay seen from the track to the south.
Image date: 17 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU466185.
WGS84: 50° 57′ 52″ N 1° 20′ 15″ W.

(84.4KB)

A number of the pictures on this page are shown by kind permission of Marie Keates. A keen walker, she has written about and illustrated several attempts to walk the full length of the Navigation during 2013 in her blog at http://www.iwalkalone.co.uk. She has walked along all or parts of the Navigation often since then: all illustrated with some excellent photographs.