Itchen Navigation: A Portrait

Cobden Bridge - Northam

Distance: 1.1 mile (1.7 km)

Introduction

It is impossible to walk directly beside the tidal river all the way from Cobden Bridge to Northam Bridge on either bank. No towing path was ever constructed south of Wood Mill. However, with the addition, a few years ago, of the new boardwalk alongside the river south of St Denys, it is possible to walk beside all but quarter of a mile along the west side of the river although in three separate sections.

St Denys Railway Bridge, a quarter of a mile downstream of Cobden Bridge, was opened in 1866 by the Southampton and Netley Railway to serve the new military hospital at Netley. This was just before the demise of traffic on the Itchen Navigation and evidence about the way the barges were worked on the tidal Itchen with no towing path was given when the railway company’s bill came before Parliament. The bridge consists of three spans supported by two pairs of iron cylindrical columns in the river. Although repairs have been made to the bridge, its appearance remains unchanged. The line was extended to Fareham in 1889.

East side of the river

To continue south along the east side of the Itchen (which is the direction taken by the Itchen Way), walk up from the river to the road and cross it at the traffic lights. Walk up the hill and turn right into Whitworth Crescent just below the Bitterne Park Hotel. The river can be seen at a number of places along this road. On the river south of Riverdene Place, the bank is taken up with moorings for small boats.

However, as the Southampton to Fareham railway line intervenes, it is necessary to make for Bitterne railway station to cross the line. At the southern end of Whitworth Crescent, the road turns sharp left becoming Whitworth Road. Ahead, at the T-junction turn right into MacNaghten Road which shortly turns left and comes to Bitterne station. There is a ramped path from the station car park (by the platform) up onto the main road (Bitterne Road West, A3024) and the bridge over the railway.

St Denys Railway Bridge
St Denys Railway Bridge

St Denys Railway Bridge as seen from Cobden Bridge.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU438140. WGS84: 50° 55′ 28″ N 1° 22′ 40″ W.

St Denys Railway Bridge

St Denys Railway Bridge as seen from Cobden Bridge.
Image date: 13 Apr 2003.
NG Ref: SU438140.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 28″ N 1° 22′ 40″ W.

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View below Cobden Bridge
View below Cobden Bridge

Evening view of the east bank of the river below Cobden Bridge with new apartments replacing industry. Houses in Whitworth Crescent may be seen beyond.
Image date: 6 Apr 2006. © Footprints (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU438140. WGS84: 50° 55′ 28″ N 1° 22′ 42″ W.

View below Cobden Bridge

Evening view of the east bank of the river below Cobden Bridge with new apartments replacing industry.
Image date: 6 Apr 2006.
NG Ref: SU438140.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 28″ N 1° 22′ 42″ W.

(58.2KB)

Cobden Bridge from downstream
Cobden Bridge from downstream

A view of Cobden Bridge seen from downsteam in Whitworth Crescent.
Image date: 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU438137. WGS84: 50° 55′ 16″ N 1° 22′ 40″ W.

Cobden Bridge from downstream

A view of Cobden Bridge seen from downsteam in Whitworth Crescent.
Image date: 1976.
NG Ref: SU438137.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 16″ N 1° 22′ 40″ W.

(63.2KB)

Boats moored off Whitworth Crescent
Boats moored off Whitworth Crescent

Taken from a moving train on the railway bridge over the river, these boats are moored on the east bank off Whitworth Crescent.
Image date: Jun 1986. © Peter Shimmon (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU436136. WGS84: 50° 55′ 15″ N 1° 22′ 47″ W.

Boats moored off Whitworth Crescent

Taken from a moving train on the railway bridge over the river, these boats are moored on the east bank off Whitworth Crescent.
Image date: Jun 1986.
NG Ref: SU436136.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 15″ N 1° 22′ 47″ W.

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Aerial view of St Denys Railway Bridge
Aerial view of St Denys Railway Bridge

Aerial view of St Denys Railway Bridge seen from the south-east.
Image date: 6 Jul 2016. © David Dixon (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU440133. WGS84: 50° 55′ 03″ N 1° 22′ 31″ W.

Aerial view of St Denys Railway Bridge

Aerial view of St Denys Railway Bridge seen from the south-east.
Image date: 6 Jul 2016.
NG Ref: SU440133.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 03″ N 1° 22′ 31″ W.

(111.9KB)

Having crossed the railway line, the official route of the Itchen Way turns right down some steps and/or a path, just before the petrol station, into Chafen Road. At its northern end, the road turns left to become Vespasian Road. Behind the buildings lining the north-west side of this road are moorings for many small boats but the river is inaccessible to the public and largely unseen behind housing and commercial buildings. Given this, it might be better (and a slightly shorter distance) for walkers to enter the Park from the main road where it bends left towards Northam Bridge.

At the far (south-western) end of Vespasian Road, the Itchen Way enters Bitterne Manor Park where there is also a small car park. Bitterne Manor Park is not large but it reaches down to the river from the main road. Views of the river up to the St Denys railway bridge and to below Priory Hard (on the west bank) can be had.

Much of the area on this side of the railway was a small Roman town thought to be Clausentum occupied from about AD 70-400. The sole visible structural remains at Clausentum comprise the restored foundations of the 2nd century bath house and a fragment of the 3rd century town wall on the north side, now reduced to an overgrown bank. The remains are located on private property, at Bitterne Manor House, and permission is needed to see them. More information about Clausentum and pictures of the area may be found on Marie Keates’ blog.

To make for Northam Quay, leave the park by heading away from the river up to the main road. Turn right along the road and over the bridge from this entrance. Before reaching the bridge, it also possible to walk upstream along the river on the south side of Centurion Park (an industrial park) for about 230 yards. Currently, the path, which used to go further, is now fenced off at this point.

View upstream from Bitterne Manor Park
View upstream from Bitterne Manor Park

The view upstream from Bitterne Manor Park with the railway bridge in the distance.
Image date: 16 May 2014. © Alex McGregor (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU434134. WGS84: 50° 55′ 08″ N 1° 23′ 01″ W.

View upstream from Bitterne Manor Park

The view upstream from Bitterne Manor Park with the railway bridge in the distance.
Image date: 16 May 2014.
NG Ref: SU434134.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 08″ N 1° 23′ 01″ W.

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Bitterne Manor Park at a very high tide
Bitterne Manor Park at a very high tide

The west side of the river seen from Bitterne Manor Park at a very high tide.
Image date: 2 Jan 2014. © Alex McGregor (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU434134. WGS84: 50° 55′ 08″ N 1° 22′ 59″ W.

Bitterne Manor Park at a very high tide

The west side of the river seen from Bitterne Manor Park at a very high tide.
Image date: 2 Jan 2014.
NG Ref: SU434134.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 08″ N 1° 22′ 59″ W.

(68.5KB)

Bitterne Manor Park from across the river
Bitterne Manor Park from across the river

Bitterne Manor Park seen from the west side of the river near Collier Close.
Image date: 18 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU434136. WGS84: 50° 55′ 15″ N 1° 23′ 01″ W.

Bitterne Manor Park from across the river

Bitterne Manor Park seen from the west side of the river near Collier Close.
Image date: 18 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU434136.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 15″ N 1° 23′ 01″ W.

(44.1KB)

Priory Hard
Priory Hard

A view of Priory Hard from across the river at Bitterne Manor Park.
Image date: 18 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU434134. WGS84: 50° 55′ 08″ N 1° 22′ 59″ W.

Priory Hard

A view of Priory Hard from across the river at Bitterne Manor Park.
Image date: 18 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU434134.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 08″ N 1° 22′ 59″ W.

(57.4KB)

Northam Bridge
Northam Bridge

Northam Bridge pictured from Centurion Park.
Image date: May 2017. © 2019 Google. NG Ref: SU432131. WGS84: 50° 54′ 58″ N 1° 23′ 11″ W.

Northam Bridge

Northam Bridge pictured from Centurion Park.
Image date: May 2017.
NG Ref: SU432131.
WGS84: 50° 54′ 58″ N 1° 23′ 11″ W.

(57.8KB)

West side of the river

To walk along the west side of the river, cross Cobden Bridge and turn left along Priory Road. Although this road runs up to about 100 yards away from the river it is possible to access the bank via side roads leading into small housing estates with paths leading between the houses. The first of these is Pettinger Gardens north of the railway bridge over Priory Road giving access to about 120 yards of river bank. South of the railway, Janaway Gardens and Collier Close similarly give access to the river and around 230 yards of bank. A path along the river bank also links these two roads.

The next access to the river comes at Priory Hard. This is the public hard furthest upstream on the tidal river where it is possible to launch a small boat. At the back of the houses between Collier Close and the hard are private moorings for many small boats. To the south-west of the hard lies the modern gated development known as Quay 2000. There is a path that used to be open to the public running round the development between it and the river but this has recently been closed.

Cobden Bridge
Cobden Bridge

Cobden Bridge seen from the downstream west bank near Pettinger Gardens.
Image date: 18 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU436139. WGS84: 50° 55′ 23″ N 1° 22′ 48″ W.

Cobden Bridge

Cobden Bridge seen from the downstream west bank near Pettinger Gardens.
Image date: 18 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU436139.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 23″ N 1° 22′ 48″ W.

(55.3KB)

St Denys Railway Bridge
St Denys Railway Bridge

The south-west side of St Denys Railway Bridge seen from near Janaway Gardens.
Image date: 18 Feb 2019. © 2019 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU434137. WGS84: 50° 55′ 17″ N 1° 22′ 58″ W.

St Denys Railway Bridge

The south-west side of St Denys Railway Bridge seen from near Janaway Gardens.
Image date: 18 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU434137.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 17″ N 1° 22′ 58″ W.

(61.4KB)

Priory Hard
Priory Hard

Priory Hard off Priory Road. Across the river is new housing south of Bitterne Manor.
Image date: 17 Jul 2010. © Mike Faherty (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU431136. WGS84: 50° 55′ 14″ N 1° 23′ 14″ W.

Priory Hard

Priory Hard off Priory Road. Across the river is new housing south of Bitterne Manor.
Image date: 17 Jul 2010.
NG Ref: SU431136.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 14″ N 1° 23′ 14″ W.

(69.9KB)

Upstream of Priory Hard
Upstream of Priory Hard

The view upstream from near Priory Hard at high tide.
Image date: 12 May 2005. © 2010 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU431135. WGS84: 50° 55′ 12″ N 1° 23′ 15″ W.

Upstream of Priory Hard

The view upstream from near Priory Hard at high tide.
Image date: 12 May 2005.
NG Ref: SU431135.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 12″ N 1° 23′ 15″ W.

(54.6KB)

Bitterne Manor
Bitterne Manor

Bitterne Manor lies on the east bank and, to its left, Bitterne Manor Park seen from near Priory Hard at high tide.
Image date: 12 May 2005. © 2010 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU431135. WGS84: 50° 55′ 12″ N 1° 23′ 15″ W.

Bitterne Manor

Bitterne Manor lies on the east bank and, to its left, Bitterne Manor Park seen from near Priory Hard at high tide.
Image date: 12 May 2005.
NG Ref: SU431135.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 12″ N 1° 23′ 15″ W.

(52.1KB)

When the London and Southampton Railway was built in the late 1830s, a causeway was constructed across Bevois (pronounced Beavers) Valley, a large tidal bay which extended west to the back of the buildings in Bevois Valley Road. This bay was flooded at high tide but was rather marshy and much of it “dried out” at low water. The bay west of the railway was reclaimed during the latter part of the 19th century and Empress Road was laid out. In the first decade of the 20th century a large part at the southern end was covered in railway sidings. In the 1960s and 70s the area around Empress Road was developed as an industrial estate and during the 1990s most of the sidings were taken up.

In 2010, the Itchen Riverside Boardwalk was constructed along the east side of the railway line to provide a safer and more pleasant North-South route to Southampton's city centre, railway station and football ground for cyclists and walkers. This pathway is partially cantilevered out over the foreshore. It links the Horseshoe Bridge over the railway near Priory Road with Northam, joining with pre-existing footpaths which lead along the river’s edge to the south end of Northam Bridge.

From the late 19th century until the 1970s a number of timber merchants had businesses in the Northam Bridge area and there were extensive timber ponds upstream of the bridge. Those on the south side of the river are now reclaimed land and in 2019, having previously been the site of television studios, are being redeveloped as housing.

“Bittern from Bevois Mount”
“Bittern from Bevois Mount”

Entitled “Bittern from Bevois Mount”, this engraving shows Bevois Valley with Northam Farm (now the Old Farmhouse public house) in Mount Pleasant Road, the new railway, and the masts of vessels beyond Northam Bridge.
Image date: c1840. Drawn by G F Sargant and engraved by J Woods. NG Ref: SU424132. WGS84: 50° 55′ 00″ N 1° 23′ 50″ W.

“Bittern from Bevois Mount”

Bevois Valley with Northam Farm (now the Old Farmhouse public house) on the right, the new railway, and the masts of vessels beyond Northam Bridge.
Image date: c1840.
NG Ref: SU424132.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 00″ N 1° 23′ 50″ W.

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View from Horseshoe Bridge
View from Horseshoe Bridge

Looking south from Horseshoe Bridge over the main line from London with the river and the boardwalk to the left.
Image date: 17 Jul 2010. © Mike Faherty (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU430135. WGS84: 50° 55′ 10″ N 1° 23′ 23″ W.

View from Horseshoe Bridge

Looking south from Horseshoe Bridge over the main line from London with the river and the boardwalk to the left.
Image date: 17 Jul 2010.
NG Ref: SU430135.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 10″ N 1° 23′ 23″ W.

(79.0KB)

Itchen Riverside Boardwalk
Itchen Riverside Boardwalk

Looking north along Itchen Riverside Boardwalk, running between the river and the railway, linking St Denys and Northam.
Image date: 5 May 2013. © Hugh Venables (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU429133. WGS84: 50° 55′ 06″ N 1° 23′ 25″ W.

Itchen Riverside Boardwalk

Looking north along Itchen Riverside Boardwalk, running between the river and the railway, linking St Denys and Northam.
Image date: 5 May 2013.
NG Ref: SU429133.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 06″ N 1° 23′ 25″ W.

(54.5KB)

Southern end of the Boardwalk
Southern end of the Boardwalk

The southern end of the Itchen Boardwalk.
Image date: 6 Jan 2016. © 2016 Marie Keates. Image from www.iwalkalone.co.uk.. NG Ref: SU429131. WGS84: 50° 54′ 58″ N 1° 23′ 28″ W.

Southern end of the Boardwalk

The southern end of the Itchen Boardwalk.
Image date: 6 Jan 2016.
NG Ref: SU429131.
WGS84: 50° 54′ 58″ N 1° 23′ 28″ W.

(65.1KB)

Timber ponds above Northam Bridge
Timber ponds above Northam Bridge

The second Northam Bridge seen from upstream showing some of the timber ponds. The area of these ponds is now dry land, the last part being reclaimed to build TV studios in the late 1960s.
Image date: c1908. Image from postcard. NG Ref: SU429128. WGS84: 50° 54′ 49″ N 1° 23′ 24″ W.

Timber ponds above Northam Bridge

The second Northam Bridge seen from upstream showing some of the timber ponds.
Image date: c1908.
NG Ref: SU429128.
WGS84: 50° 54′ 49″ N 1° 23′ 24″ W.

(53.8KB)

The current Northam Bridge
The current Northam Bridge

The third Northam Bridge seen from upstream by the current shoreline about 150 yards north-east of the last picture. The hoarding on the right masks the redevelopment of the site of the TV studios.
Image date: 18 Feb 2019. © 2010 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU430129. WGS84: 50° 54′ 53″ N 1° 23′ 20″ W.

The current Northam Bridge

The third Northam Bridge seen from upstream by the current shoreline about 150 yards north-east of the last picture.
Image date: 18 Feb 2019.
NG Ref: SU430129.
WGS84: 50° 54′ 53″ N 1° 23′ 20″ W.

(40.2KB)

River Itchen above Northam Bridge
River Itchen above Northam Bridge

Reach of the River Itchen above Northam Bridge looking upstream from that bridge.
Image date: 12 May 2005. © 2010 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU431128. WGS84: 50° 54′ 50″ N 1° 23′ 13″ W.

River Itchen above Northam Bridge

Reach of the River Itchen above Northam Bridge looking upstream from that bridge.
Image date: 12 May 2005.
NG Ref: SU431128.
WGS84: 50° 54′ 50″ N 1° 23′ 13″ W.

(39.1KB)

Northam

The first Northam Bridge was opened in 1799 as part of the new turnpike road from Southampton to Bursledon which is on the way to Portsmouth. The bridge was mainly wooden and was replaced by an iron bridge in 1889. The toll was removed from the bridge when it was bought by Southampton Corporation in 1929.

The present bridge is the third to cross the river and was opened in 1954. It was the first major pre-stressed concrete road bridge built in the UK. Whilst the causeway which led to the first and second bridges can be seen on the east bank (north side) of the river, nothing else survives of either of these two bridges.

The Navigation wharf at Northam Quay (sometimes called Northam Wharf) used to be situated just downstream of the bridge on the west bank, but the area has completely changed in the 150 years since barges ceased trading to Winchester. The site of the northern end of the quay is very close to the face of the current quay, but high water mark of the early 1800’s is now around 25 yards inland.

Northam Quay was the furthest that laden sea-going vessels could reliably go up the River Itchen even before the road bridge was built as the river shallows upstream. It also had the advantage that it was outside the town of Southampton and therefore avoided the high port dues payable when using the port of Southampton.

At the end of the 18th century, the Northam branch of the Southampton and Salisbury Canal was under construction from the east end of the canal tunnel in Southampton to a tidal lock about 200 metres east of the Quay. However, it is believed that this section of waterway was not completed and that no boats traded along it. No trace of this canal can be discerned on the ground today. For more information see the story of this canal on this website.

Northam Quay had the benefit of the Northam Quay Tramway which, from 1840, connected with the new main line railway. The tramway was soon extended to serve other adjacent wharves and shipyards and it survived in use until 1984. In fact, the tramway would not have been of much benefit to the Navigation - indeed, if anything, the reverse was probably true as it could allow the railway to compete on carrying goods between Northam and Winchester.

It was usual to transfer cargoes overside from ship to barge (or vice versa) rather than land them on the quay - it seems likely that this avoided double handling and paying wharfage charges. However, regulations were made that a certain number of vessels had to land cargoes at the quay.

Northam Bridge (c1850)
Northam Bridge (c1850)

Northam Bridge as drawn and engraved by Philip Brannon. The vertical scale is somewhat exaggerated and the type of ship shown here was bigger than depicted!
Image date: c1850. Image from the book “The Picture of Southampton ...” by Philip Brannon 2nd edition published in 1850. NG Ref: SU433128. WGS84: 50° 54′ 48″ N 1° 23′ 06″ W.

Northam Bridge (c1850)

Northam Bridge as drawn and engraved by Philip Brannon.
Image date: c1850.
NG Ref: SU433128.
WGS84: 50° 54′ 48″ N 1° 23′ 06″ W.

(74.8KB)

Northam Bridge (1888)
Northam Bridge (1888)

Northam Bridge photographed by Thomas Hibberd James the year before the second bridge was built. The nearest vessel moored against Northam Quay is the William Maskell.
Image date: 1888. Image from River Itchen Archaeological Project. NG Ref: SU432128. WGS84: 50° 54′ 48″ N 1° 23′ 10″ W.

Northam Bridge (1888)

Northam Bridge photographed by Thomas Hibberd James the year before the second bridge was built.
Image date: 1888.
NG Ref: SU432128.
WGS84: 50° 54′ 48″ N 1° 23′ 10″ W.

(67.7KB)

The <i>Rosie</i> moored at Northam Quay
The Rosie moored at Northam Quay

The Rosie from Littlehampton moored against Northam Quay with the wooden Northam Bridge beyond photographed by Thomas Hibberd James.
Image date: 1888. Image from River Itchen Archaeological Project. NG Ref: SU433128. WGS84: 50° 54′ 49″ N 1° 23′ 06″ W.

The Rosie moored at Northam Quay

The Rosie from Littlehampton moored against Northam Quay photographed by Thomas Hibberd James.
Image date: 1888.
NG Ref: SU433128.
WGS84: 50° 54′ 49″ N 1° 23′ 06″ W.

(62.8KB)

Northam toll gate
Northam toll gate

The toll gate at the Southampton end of the second bridge. Note the mast of a vessel at Northam Quay on the right of the picture.
Image date: Before 1912. Image from postcard posted in 1912. NG Ref: SU431128. WGS84: 50° 54′ 47″ N 1° 23′ 13″ W.

Northam toll gate

The toll gate at the Southampton end of the second bridge.
Image date: Before 1912.
NG Ref: SU431128.
WGS84: 50° 54′ 47″ N 1° 23′ 13″ W.

(54.6KB)

The second Northam Bridge
The second Northam Bridge

The second bridge viewed across Northam Quay.
Image date: c1900. Image: Southern Daily Echo. NG Ref: SU432128. WGS84: 50° 54′ 48″ N 1° 23′ 07″ W.

The second Northam Bridge

The second bridge viewed across Northam Quay.
Image date: c1900.
NG Ref: SU432128.
WGS84: 50° 54′ 48″ N 1° 23′ 07″ W.

(50.7KB)

Aerial view of Northam
Aerial view of Northam

An aerial view of the second Northam Bridge from the north with Northam Quay visible just beyond it.
Image date: 1933. © Historic England. Image from Britain from Above. Other images in the vicinity may accessed via the Britain from Above website. NG Ref: SU431141. WGS84: 50° 55′ 30″ N 1° 23′ 13″ W.

Aerial view of Northam

An aerial view of the second Northam Bridge from the north with Northam Quay visible just beyond it.
Image date: 1933.
NG Ref: SU431141.
WGS84: 50° 55′ 30″ N 1° 23′ 13″ W.

(58.9KB)

Northam Bridge (1954)
Northam Bridge (1954)

The present Northam Bridge under construction next to the second bridge which was demolished after the new bridge opened in October 1954.
Image date: 1954. Image: Southern Daily Echo. NG Ref: SU431127. WGS84: 50° 54′ 47″ N 1° 23′ 17″ W.

Northam Bridge (1954)

The present Northam Bridge under construction next to the second bridge.
Image date: 1954.
NG Ref: SU431127.
WGS84: 50° 54′ 47″ N 1° 23′ 17″ W.

(69.5KB)

Northam Bridge in 2005
Northam Bridge in 2005

The downstream side of the present Northam Bridge.
Image date: 12 May 2005. © 2010 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU432128. WGS84: 50° 54′ 49″ N 1° 23′ 11″ W.

Northam Bridge in 2005

The downstream side of the present Northam Bridge.
Image date: 12 May 2005.
NG Ref: SU432128.
WGS84: 50° 54′ 49″ N 1° 23′ 11″ W.

(40.3KB)

Causeway to old bridges
Causeway to old bridges

The causeway on the Bitterne Manor side of the river that used to lead to the first and second bridges.
Image date: 5 May 2013. © Hugh Venables (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU432129. WGS84: 50° 54′ 52″ N 1° 23′ 10″ W.

Causeway to old bridges

The causeway on the Bitterne Manor side of the river that used to lead to the first and second bridges.
Image date: 5 May 2013.
NG Ref: SU432129.
WGS84: 50° 54′ 52″ N 1° 23′ 10″ W.

(60.3KB)

Aerial view of Northam Bridge
Aerial view of Northam Bridge

Aerial view from the south-east of Northam Bridge just beyond the site of Northam Quay.
Image date: 6 Jul 2016. © David Dixon (cc-by-sa/2.0). Image from www.geograph.org.uk. NG Ref: SU436124. WGS84: 50° 54′ 34″ N 1° 22′ 48″ W.

Aerial view of Northam Bridge

Aerial view from the south-east of Northam Bridge just beyond the site of Northam Quay.
Image date: 6 Jul 2016.
NG Ref: SU436124.
WGS84: 50° 54′ 34″ N 1° 22′ 48″ W.

(98.4KB)

Site of Northam Quay
Site of Northam Quay

The site of Northam Quay as seen from Northam Bridge. The cream roofed boat is moored at the site of the end of Northam Quay.
Image date: 12 May 2005. © 2010 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU432129. WGS84: 50° 54′ 51″ N 1° 23′ 11″ W.

Site of Northam Quay

The site of Northam Quay as seen from Northam Bridge.
Image date: 12 May 2005.
NG Ref: SU432129.
WGS84: 50° 54′ 51″ N 1° 23′ 11″ W.

(43.6KB)

Coastal vessel at Northam Quay
Coastal vessel at Northam Quay

A small coastal vessel at Northam Quay in a rather murky photograph.
Image date: Possibly early 20th century. Image from River Itchen Archaeological Project. NG Ref: SU432128. WGS84: 50° 54′ 50″ N 1° 23′ 11″ W.

Coastal vessel at Northam Quay

A small coastal vessel at Northam Quay in a rather murky photograph.
Image date: Possibly early 20th century.
NG Ref: SU432128.
WGS84: 50° 54′ 50″ N 1° 23′ 11″ W.

(76.2KB)

Below Northam Bridge
Below Northam Bridge

River Itchen below Northam Bridge viewed from Athelstan Road.
Image date: 1976. Image scanned from slide. © 2003 Peter Oates. NG Ref: SU444126. WGS84: 50° 54′ 43″ N 1° 22′ 11″ W.

Below Northam Bridge

River Itchen below Northam Bridge viewed from Athelstan Road.
Image date: 1976.
NG Ref: SU444126.
WGS84: 50° 54′ 43″ N 1° 22′ 11″ W.

(49.8KB)

One of the pictures on this page is shown by kind permission of Marie Keates. A keen walker, she has written about and illustrated several attempts to walk the full length of the Navigation during 2013 in her blog at http://www.iwalkalone.co.uk. She has walked along all or parts of the Navigation often since then: all illustrated with some excellent photographs.